mTeSR™1

cGMP, feeder-free maintenance medium for human ES and iPS cells
Catalog #
85850_C
cGMP, feeder-free maintenance medium for human ES and iPS cells
From: 289 USD
New look, same high quality and support! You may notice that your instrument or reagent packaging looks slightly different from images displayed on the website, or from previous orders. We are updating our look but rest assured, the products themselves and how you should use them have not changed. Learn more

Overview

Use this specialized, feeder-free culture medium to achieve more consistent human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) cultures with homogenous, undifferentiated phenotypes.

Manufactured under relevant cGMPs, mTeSR™1 ensures the highest quality and consistency for reproducible results in your fundamental research, as well as for cell therapy and investigational new drug research applications. This serum-free, complete cell culture medium is made with pre-screened raw materials to ensure batch-to-batch consistency and robust performance in feeder-free hPSC culture.

Use established protocols for applications ranging from derivation to differentiation with this most widely published feeder-free hPSC culture medium, which has been used by leading pluripotent stem cell researchers to successfully maintain thousands of hPSC lines in over 50 countries. For enhanced cell performance and versatile maintenance, you may also be interested in mTeSR™ Plus medium, which is also manufactured under relevant cGMPs and features stabilized components and enhanced buffering.

To request a Letter of Authorization (LOA) for mTeSR™1’s Drug Master File, click here.
Components
  • mTeSR™1 Complete Kit (Catalog #85850)
    • mTeSR™1 Basal Medium, 400 mL
    • mTeSR™1 5X Supplement, 100 mL
  • mTeSR™1 Complete Kit, 1 L (Catalog #85857)
    • mTeSR™1 Basal Medium, 800 mL
    • mTeSR™1 5X Supplement, 100 mL, 2 Bottles
  • mTeSR™1 Complete Kit, 10 Pack (Catalog #85870)
    • mTeSR™1 Basal Medium, 400 mL, 10 Bottles
    • mTeSR™1 5X Supplement, 100 mL, 10 Bottles
  • mTeSR™1 Complete Kit, 25 Pack (Catalog #85875)
    • mTeSR™1 Basal Medium, 400 mL, 25 Bottles
    • mTeSR™1 5X Supplement, 100 mL, 25 Bottles
Subtype
Specialized Media
Cell Type
Pluripotent Stem Cells
Species
Human
Application
Cell Culture, Expansion, Maintenance
Brand
TeSR
Area of Interest
Stem Cell Biology
Formulation
Serum-Free

Scientific Resources

Product Documentation

Document Type Product Name Catalog # Lot # Language
Document Type
Product Information Sheet
Product Name
mTeSR™1
Catalog #
85850, 85857
Lot #
All
Language
English
Document Type
Manual
Product Name
mTeSR™1
Catalog #
85850
Lot #
All
Language
English
Document Type
Safety Data Sheet 1
Product Name
mTeSR™1
Catalog #
85850
Lot #
All
Language
English
Document Type
Safety Data Sheet 2
Product Name
mTeSR™1
Catalog #
85850
Lot #
All
Language
English
Document Type
Safety Data Sheet 3
Product Name
mTeSR™1
Catalog #
85850
Lot #
All
Language
English

Educational Materials (40)

Brochure
qPCR Arrays for Cell Characterization
Brochure
Products for Human Pluripotent Stem Cells
Brochure
2019-2020 Cell Culture Training Catalog
Brochure
mTeSR™3D Suspension Culture Medium for hPSCs
Brochure
cGMP mTeSR™1
Brochure
Maximize Your Pluripotential with the TeSR™ Family of hPSC Culture Media
Technical Bulletin
Weekend-Free Culture of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells in mTeSR™1 or TeSR™-E8™
Wallchart
Pluripotent Stem Cell Biology
Wallchart
Stem Cell States: Naive to Primed Pluripotency
Wallchart
Derivation and Applications of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells
Wallchart
Directed Differentiation of Pluripotent Stem Cells
Video
How to Count hPSC Aggregates to Determine Plating Density for Maintenance and Differentiation
3:39
How to Count hPSC Aggregates to Determine Plating Density for Maintenance and Differentiation
Video
Limitless Potential: Do More with TeSR™
3:10
Limitless Potential: Do More with TeSR™
Video
A Guide to Passaging Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Using mTeSR™1
5:58
A Guide to Passaging Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Using mTeSR™1
Video
STEMCELL Journal Club: Cerebral Organoids for Human-Specific Infection Modeling
28:45
STEMCELL Journal Club: Cerebral Organoids for Human-Specific Infection Modeling
Video
How to Set Up an Assay with the hPSC Genetic Analysis Kit Experiment
8:33
How to Set Up an Assay with the hPSC Genetic Analysis Kit Experiment
Video
mTeSR™1: The Most Published, Feeder-Independent hESC & hiPSC Maintenance Medium
1:45
mTeSR™1: The Most Published, Feeder-Independent hESC & hiPSC Maintenance Medium
Video
How to Grow Cerebral Organoids from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells
9:18
How to Grow Cerebral Organoids from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells
Video
mTeSR™1: Standardized Medium for the Feeder-Independent Maintenance of hESCs & hiPSCs
1:27
mTeSR™1: Standardized Medium for the Feeder-Independent Maintenance of hESCs & hiPSCs
Webinar
Nature Research Round Table: Retinal Cell Therapy Using Human Embryonic Stem Cells
19:35
Nature Research Round Table: Retinal Cell Therapy Using Human Embryonic Stem Cells
Webinar
Nature Research Round Table: HLA Typing Considerations for Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Banking
13:01
Nature Research Round Table: HLA Typing Considerations for Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Banking
Webinar
Optimized Workflows for High-Efficiency Genome Editing in Stem and Primary Cell Types
1:07:14
Optimized Workflows for High-Efficiency Genome Editing in Stem and Primary Cell Types
Webinar
Maintaining and Assessing High-Quality hPSC Cultures
55:53
Maintaining and Assessing High-Quality hPSC Cultures
Webinar
Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Selective Pressures and Dominant Negative Mutations in hPSC Cultures
53:35
Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Selective Pressures and Dominant Negative Mutations in hPSC Cultures
Webinar
Quality Control Guidelines for Clinical-Grade Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines
1:13:44
Quality Control Guidelines for Clinical-Grade Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines
Webinar
Nature Research Round Table: Parkinson's Disease Therapy with Human Embryonic Stem Cells
24:46
Nature Research Round Table: Parkinson's Disease Therapy with Human Embryonic Stem Cells
Webinar
Nature Research Round Table: Standards for Pluripotent Stem Cell Banking
13:02
Nature Research Round Table: Standards for Pluripotent Stem Cell Banking
Webinar
Nature Research Round Table: Maintenance of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells In Vitro
20:09
Nature Research Round Table: Maintenance of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells In Vitro
Webinar
hPSC Quality: Essential Considerations for Gene Editing, Cloning, Maintenance and Disease Modeling
50:49
hPSC Quality: Essential Considerations for Gene Editing, Cloning, Maintenance and Disease Modeling
Webinar
Brains in a Dish: Using Cerebral Organoids to Study Human Brain Development and Disease
25:30
Brains in a Dish: Using Cerebral Organoids to Study Human Brain Development and Disease
Webinar
Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for the Treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Compliance Considerations for Clinical-Grade iPSCs
47:23
Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for the Treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Compliance Considerations for Clinical-Grade iPSCs
Webinar
Genome Editing From Modeling Disease to Novel Therapeutics
42:37
Genome Editing From Modeling Disease to Novel Therapeutics
Webinar
Nature Research Round Table: Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines as Disease Models
17:30
Nature Research Round Table: Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines as Disease Models
Webinar
Nature Research Round Table: Defining and Maintaining Pluripotency & hPSC Line Registration and Banking - Panel Discussion
33:47
Nature Research Round Table: Defining and Maintaining Pluripotency & hPSC Line Registration and Banking - Panel Discussion
Webinar
Nature Research Round Table: Regulations Around Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Registration
21:35
Nature Research Round Table: Regulations Around Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Registration
Webinar
Development, Compatibility, and Applications of mTeSR™ Plus; an Enhanced Medium for the Maintenance of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells (hPSCs)
42:10
Development, Compatibility, and Applications of mTeSR™ Plus; an Enhanced Medium for the Maintenance of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells (hPSCs)
Webinar
Madeline Lancaster on Brain Organoids: Modeling Human Brain Development in a Dish
47:18
Madeline Lancaster on Brain Organoids: Modeling Human Brain Development in a Dish
Webinar
Building Brain Organoids and AssemBloids™ to Study Human Development and Disease
1:02:03
Building Brain Organoids and AssemBloids™ to Study Human Development and Disease
Webinar
Investigating Metabolic Disease with Human Pluripotent Stem Cells
49:25
Investigating Metabolic Disease with Human Pluripotent Stem Cells
Webinar
Nature Research Round Table: hPSC Lines for Cell Therapies - Panel Discussion
29:03
Nature Research Round Table: hPSC Lines for Cell Therapies - Panel Discussion
Load More Educational Materials

Product Applications

This product is designed for use in the following research area(s) as part of the highlighted workflow stage(s). Explore these workflows to learn more about the other products we offer to support each research area.

Data and Publications

Data

Figure 1. Normal hES and hiPS Cell Morphology is Observed in cGMP mTeSR™1 Cultures

Undifferentiated (A) H1 human embryonic stem (hES) and (B) WLS-1C human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells cultured on Corning® Matrigel® Matrix in cGMP mTeSR™1 retain the prominent nucleoli and high nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio characteristic of this cell type after 10 passages. Densely packed cells and multi-layering are prominent when cells are ready to be passaged.

Figure 2. High Expansion Rates are Observed in cGMP mTeSR™1 Cultures

Graph shows the average fold expansion per passage +/- SEM obtained for hES (H1 and H9) and hiPS (WLS-1C) cells cultured in cGMP mTeSR­™1 (red) or non-cGMP mTeSR™1 (gray) on Corning® Matrigel® Matrix over 10 passages. Expansion was determined by enumerating the cell aggregates obtained at harvest and dividing by the number of cell aggregates seeded. Note that this data is representative of cultures passaged after 6-7 days in culture, lower expansion should be expected if using shorter culture times.

Figure 3. Cells Cultured in cGMP mTeSR™1 Medium Express Undifferentiated Cell Markers

Histogram analysis for hES (H1 and H9) and hiPS (WLS-1C) cells characterized using FACS for undifferentiated cell markers, OCT4 (OCT3) (Catalog #60093) and TRA-1-60 (Catalog #60064), after 8 - 10 passages in cGMP mTeSR™1 (filled = sample, blank = isotype control).

Figure 4. hPSCs Maintained in cGMP mTeSR™1 Display a Normal Karyotype

Karyograms of (A) H1 hES and (B) WLS-1C hiPS cells cultured in cGMP mTeSR™1 for 11 passages shows that a normal karyotype is retained.

Publications (1576)

Stem cell reports 2020 feb iPSC-Based Modeling of RAG2 Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Reveals Multiple T Cell Developmental Arrests. M. Themeli et al.

Abstract

RAG2 severe combined immune deficiency (RAG2-SCID) is a lethal disorder caused by the absence of functional T and B cells due to a differentiation block. Here, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a RAG2-SCID patient to study the nature of the T cell developmental blockade. We observed a strongly reduced capacity to differentiate at every investigated stage of T cell development, from early CD7-CD5- to CD4+CD8+. The impaired differentiation was accompanied by an increase in CD7-CD56+CD33+ natural killer (NK) cell-like cells. T cell receptor D rearrangements were completely absent in RAG2SCID cells, whereas the rare T cell receptor B rearrangements were likely the result of illegitimate rearrangements. Repair of RAG2 restored the capacity to induce T cell receptor rearrangements, normalized T cell development, and corrected the NK cell-like phenotype. In conclusion, we succeeded in generating an iPSC-based RAG2-SCID model, which enabled the identification of previously unrecognized disorder-related T cell developmental roadblocks.
Frontiers in bioengineering and biotechnology 2020 Maturation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cerebellar Neurons in the Absence of Co-culture. T. P. Silva et al.

Abstract

The cerebellum plays a critical role in all vertebrates, and many neurological disorders are associated with cerebellum dysfunction. A major limitation in cerebellar research has been the lack of adequate disease models. As an alternative to animal models, cerebellar neurons differentiated from pluripotent stem cells have been used. However, previous studies only produced limited amounts of Purkinje cells. Moreover, in vitro generation of Purkinje cells required co-culture systems, which may introduce unknown components to the system. Here we describe a novel differentiation strategy that uses defined medium to generate Purkinje cells, granule cells, interneurons, and deep cerebellar nuclei projection neurons, that self-formed and differentiated into electrically active cells. Using a defined basal medium optimized for neuronal cell culture, we successfully promoted the differentiation of cerebellar precursors without the need for co-culturing. We anticipate that our findings may help developing better models for the study of cerebellar dysfunctions, while providing an advance toward the development of autologous replacement strategies for treating cerebellar degenerative diseases.
Analytical chemistry 2020 One-Stop Microfluidic Assembly of Human Brain Organoids To Model Prenatal Cannabis Exposure. Z. Ao et al.

Abstract

Prenatal cannabis exposure (PCE) influences human brain development, but it is challenging to model PCE using animals and current cell culture techniques. Here, we developed a one-stop microfluidic platform to assemble and culture human cerebral organoids from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) to investigate the effect of PCE on early human brain development. By incorporating perfusable culture chambers, air-liquid interface, and one-stop protocol, this microfluidic platform can simplify the fabrication procedure and produce a large number of organoids (169 organoids per 3.5 cm × 3.5 cm device area) without fusion, as compared with conventional fabrication methods. These one-stop microfluidic assembled cerebral organoids not only recapitulate early human brain structure, biology, and electrophysiology but also have minimal size variation and hypoxia. Under on-chip exposure to the psychoactive cannabinoid, $\Delta$-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cerebral organoids exhibited reduced neuronal maturation, downregulation of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) receptors, and impaired neurite outgrowth. Moreover, transient on-chip THC treatment also decreased spontaneous firing in these organoids. This one-stop microfluidic technique enables a simple, scalable, and repeatable organoid culture method that can be used not only for human brain organoids but also for many other human organoids including liver, kidney, retina, and tumor organoids. This technology could be widely used in modeling brain and other organ development, developmental disorders, developmental pharmacology and toxicology, and drug screening.
Human immunology 2019 jul Patients with immunological diseases or on peritoneal dialysis are prone to false positive flow cytometry crossmatch. Q. Xu et al.

Abstract

Despite implementation of virtual crossmatches, flow cytometry crossmatches (FCXM) are still used by many transplant centers to determine immunological risk before kidney transplantation. To determine if common profiles of patients prone to false positive FCXM exist, we examined the demographics and native diseases of kidney patients tested with autologous FCXM (n = 480). Improvements to FCXM and cell isolation methods significantly reduced the positive rate from 15.1{\%} to 5.3{\%}. Patients with native diseases considered 'immunological' (vasculitis, lupus, IgA nephropathy) had more positive autologous FCXM (OR = 3.36, p = 0.003) vs. patients with all other diseases. Patients who were tested using our updated method (n = 321) still showed that these immunological diseases were a significant predictor for positive autologous FCXM (OR = 4.79, p = 0.006). Interestingly, patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) also had significantly more positive autologous FCXM than patients on hemodialysis or waiting for pre-emptive kidney transplants (OR = 3.27, p = 0.02). These findings were confirmed in patients who had false positive allogeneic FCXM. Twenty of 24 (83.3{\%}) patients with false positive allogeneic FCXM tested with updated method either had immunological diseases originally or were on PD. Our findings are helpful when interpreting an unexpected positive FCXM, especially for transplantation from deceased donors.
Stem cell reports 2019 Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cerebral Organoids Reveal Human Oligodendrogenesis with Dorsal and Ventral Origins. H. Kim et al.

Abstract

The process of oligodendrogenesis has been relatively well delineated in the rodent brain. However, it remains unknown whether analogous developmental processes are manifested in the human brain. Here we report oligodendrogenesis in forebrain organoids, generated by using OLIG2-GFP knockin human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) reporter lines. OLIG2/GFP exhibits distinct temporal expression patterns in ventral forebrain organoids (VFOs) versus dorsal forebrain organoids (DFOs). Interestingly, oligodendrogenesis can be induced in both VFOs and DFOs after neuronal maturation. Assembling VFOs and DFOs to generate fused forebrain organoids (FFOs) promotes oligodendroglia maturation. Furthermore, dorsally derived oligodendroglial cells outcompete ventrally derived oligodendroglia and become dominant in FFOs after long-term culture. Thus, our organoid models reveal human oligodendrogenesis with ventral and dorsal origins. These models will serve to study the phenotypic and functional differences between human ventrally and dorsally derived oligodendroglia and to reveal mechanisms of diseases associated with cortical myelin defects.
American journal of human genetics 2019 Mutations in ACTL6B Cause Neurodevelopmental Deficits and Epilepsy and Lead to Loss of Dendrites in Human Neurons. S. Bell et al.

Abstract

We identified individuals with variations in ACTL6B, a component of the chromatin remodeling machinery including the BAF complex. Ten individuals harbored bi-allelic mutations and presented with global developmental delay, epileptic encephalopathy, and spasticity, and ten individuals with de novo heterozygous mutations displayed intellectual disability, ambulation deficits, severe language impairment, hypotonia, Rett-like stereotypies, and minor facial dysmorphisms (wide mouth, diastema, bulbous nose). Nine of these ten unrelated individuals had the identical de novo c.1027G{\textgreater}A (p.Gly343Arg) mutation. Human-derived neurons were generated that recaptured ACTL6B expression patterns in development from progenitor cell to post-mitotic neuron, validating the use of this model. Engineered knock-out of ACTL6B in wild-type human neurons resulted in profound deficits in dendrite development, a result recapitulated in two individuals with different bi-allelic mutations, and reversed on clonal genetic repair or exogenous expression of ACTL6B. Whole-transcriptome analyses and whole-genomic profiling of the BAF complex in wild-type and bi-allelic mutant ACTL6B neural progenitor cells and neurons revealed increased genomic binding of the BAF complex in ACTL6B mutants, with corresponding transcriptional changes in several genes including TPPP and FSCN1, suggesting that altered regulation of some cytoskeletal genes contribute to altered dendrite development. Assessment of bi-alleic and heterozygous ACTL6B mutations on an ACTL6B knock-out human background demonstrated that bi-allelic mutations mimic engineered deletion deficits while heterozygous mutations do not, suggesting that the former are loss of function and the latter are gain of function. These results reveal a role for ACTL6B in neurodevelopment and implicate another component of chromatin remodeling machinery in brain disease.
View All Publications

Contact STEMCELL Technologies

Our Customer Service, Sales, and Product and Scientific Support departments in North America are available between 6 am and 5 pm Pacific Time (9 am and 8 pm Eastern Time). One of our representatives will be happy to help you by telephone or email. Please complete the form to contact us by email. A representative will get back to you shortly.
  •  

StemCell Technologies Inc. and affiliates ("STEMCELL Technologies") does not share your email address with third parties. StemCell Technologies Inc. will use your email address to confirm your identity and send you newsletters, transaction-related emails, promotional and customer service emails in accordance with our privacy policy. You can change your email preferences at any time.