ReLeSR™

cGMP, enzyme-free human pluripotent stem cell selection and passaging reagent

ReLeSR™

cGMP, enzyme-free human pluripotent stem cell selection and passaging reagent

From: 51 USD
Catalog #
05872_C
cGMP, enzyme-free human pluripotent stem cell selection and passaging reagent

Product Advantages


  • Simple passaging protocol

  • Eliminates the need for manual removal (selection) of differentiated cells

  • No manual scraping to generate cell aggregates

  • Compatible with passaging in flasks and large culture vessels

  • Chemically defined, enzyme-free, and gentle on cells

  • High expansion of human ES/iPS cells after passaging

Overview

ReLeSR™ is an enzyme-free reagent for dissociation and passaging of human embryonic stem (ES) or induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells as aggregates without manual selection or scraping. Passaging human ES/iPS cells with ReLeSR™ easily generates optimally-sized aggregates, while eliminating the hassle and variability associated with manual manipulation. By eliminating the need for scraping, ReLeSR™ enables the use of culture flasks and other closed vessels, thus facilitating culture scale-up and automation. ReLeSR™, 500 mL, is now also manufactured following relevant cGMPs under a certified quality management system to ensure the highest quality and consistency for reproducible results.

To request a Letter of Authorization (LOA) for ReLeSR’s (Catalog #100-0484) Drug Master File, click here.
Subtype
Non-Enzymatic
Cell Type
Pluripotent Stem Cells
Species
Human
Brand
ReLeSR, TeSR
Area of Interest
Stem Cell Biology

Data Figures

Passaging Protocol Comparison

Figure 1. Passaging Protocol Comparison

ReLeSR™ passaging protocol eliminates difficult and time-consuming steps, thereby enabling easy culture scale-up.
Surface area of 4 x 6 well plates (230 cm²) is comparable to that of a T225 flask (225 cm²).
TeSR™ = TeSR™ family media (mTeSR™1, TeSR™2, or TeSR™-E8™).

Selectively Detach Undifferentiated Cells

Figure 2. Selectively Detach Undifferentiated Cells

ReLeSR™ selectively detaches undifferentiated cells from pluripotent stem cell cultures without manual selection. Optimally-sized aggregates are generated following shaking/tapping of the cultureware.
(A) An hPSC culture ready for passaging. Note the presence of differentiated cells at the edge of the undifferentiated hPSC colony. (B) Following incubation with ReLeSR™, the undifferentiated hPSC colony starts to lift off of the cultureware. The differentiated cells remain attached to the cultureware. (C) Following shaking/tapping of the cultureware, the undifferentiated cells completely lift off of the cultureware. (D) The undifferentiated hPSC colony is broken up into optimally-sized aggregates for replating.

Rescue Highly Differentiated Cultures

Figure 3. Rescue Highly Differentiated Cultures

Poor quality human pluripotent stem cell cultures containing large proportions of differentiated cells can be rescued by passaging with ReLeSR™. (A) A poor quality hPSC culture containing ~50% undifferentiated cells. (B) Following passaging with ReLeSR™, the differentiated cells have largely been eliminated from the culture, with >90% undifferentiated cells present at the end of the next passage.

Select Putative iPS Cell Clones

Figure 4. Select Putative iPS Cell Clones

Easily isolate newly generated human iPS cell colonies with ReLeSR™ by selectively detaching undifferentiated cells and leaving non reprogrammed cells behind.
(A) A TeSR™-E7™ reprogramming culture which has been treated with ReLeSR™ to detach the putative iPS cell colony, leaving the non-reprogrammed and differentiated cells behind. (B) Cultures contain a high proportion of undifferentiated cells by the end of the first passage.

Protocols and Documentation

Find supporting information and directions for use in the Product Information Sheet or explore additional protocols below.

Document Type
Product Name
Catalog #
Lot #
Language
Product Name
ReLeSR™
Catalog #
05872
Lot #
All
Language
English
Product Name
ReLeSR™
Catalog #
100-0484
Lot #
All
Language
English
Document Type
Safety Data Sheet
Product Name
ReLeSR™
Catalog #
05872
Lot #
All
Language
English
Document Type
Safety Data Sheet
Product Name
ReLeSR™
Catalog #
100-0484
Lot #
All
Language
English

Applications

This product is designed for use in the following research area(s) as part of the highlighted workflow stage(s). Explore these workflows to learn more about the other products we offer to support each research area.

Resources and Publications

Educational Materials (17)

Publications (12)

Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cerebral Organoids Reveal Human Oligodendrogenesis with Dorsal and Ventral Origins. H. Kim et al. Stem cell reports 2019

Abstract

The process of oligodendrogenesis has been relatively well delineated in the rodent brain. However, it remains unknown whether analogous developmental processes are manifested in the human brain. Here we report oligodendrogenesis in forebrain organoids, generated by using OLIG2-GFP knockin human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) reporter lines. OLIG2/GFP exhibits distinct temporal expression patterns in ventral forebrain organoids (VFOs) versus dorsal forebrain organoids (DFOs). Interestingly, oligodendrogenesis can be induced in both VFOs and DFOs after neuronal maturation. Assembling VFOs and DFOs to generate fused forebrain organoids (FFOs) promotes oligodendroglia maturation. Furthermore, dorsally derived oligodendroglial cells outcompete ventrally derived oligodendroglia and become dominant in FFOs after long-term culture. Thus, our organoid models reveal human oligodendrogenesis with ventral and dorsal origins. These models will serve to study the phenotypic and functional differences between human ventrally and dorsally derived oligodendroglia and to reveal mechanisms of diseases associated with cortical myelin defects.
Disruption of GRIN2B Impairs Differentiation in Human Neurons. S. Bell et al. Stem cell reports 2018 JUL

Abstract

Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in GRIN2B, a subunit of the NMDA receptor, cause intellectual disability and language impairment. We developed clonal models of GRIN2B deletion and loss-of-function mutations in a region coding for the glutamate binding domain in human cells and generated neurons from a patient harboring a missense mutation in the same domain. Transcriptome analysis revealed extensive increases in genes associated with cell proliferation and decreases in genes associated with neuron differentiation, a result supported by extensive protein analyses. Using electrophysiology and calcium imaging, we demonstrate that NMDA receptors are present on neural progenitor cells and that human mutations in GRIN2B can impair calcium influx and membrane depolarization even in a presumed undifferentiated cell state, highlighting an important role for non-synaptic NMDA receptors. It may be this function, in part, which underlies the neurological disease observed in patients with GRIN2B mutations.
Intrinsic Immunity Shapes Viral Resistance of Stem Cells. Wu X et al. Cell 2018 JAN

Abstract

Stem cells are highly resistant to viral infection compared to their differentiated progeny; however, the mechanism is mysterious. Here, we analyzed gene expression in mammalian stem cells and cells at various stages of differentiation. We find that, conserved across species, stem cells express a subset of genes previously classified as interferon (IFN) stimulated genes (ISGs) but that expression is intrinsic, as stem cells are refractory to interferon. This intrinsic ISG expression varies in a cell-type-specific manner, and many ISGs decrease upon differentiation, at which time cells become IFN responsive, allowing induction of a broad spectrum of ISGs by IFN signaling. Importantly, we show that intrinsically expressed ISGs protect stem cells against viral infection. We demonstrate the in vivo importance of intrinsic ISG expression for protecting stem cells and their differentiation potential during viral infection. These findings have intriguing implications for understanding stem cell biology and the evolution of pathogen resistance.

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