STEMdiff™ Neural Rosette Selection Reagent

Enzyme-free reagent for the selective detachment of neural rosettes

STEMdiff™ Neural Rosette Selection Reagent

Enzyme-free reagent for the selective detachment of neural rosettes

STEMdiff™ Neural Rosette Selection Reagent
100 mL
50 USD
Catalog # 05832

Enzyme-free reagent for the selective detachment of neural rosettes

Overview

​STEMdiff™ Neural Rosette Selection Reagent is an enzyme-free reagent for the selective detachment of neural rosette clusters from adherent neural aggregates previously generated from human embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells using STEMdiff™ Neural Induction Medium, without manual scraping. Collecting and re-plating rosette clusters after incubation with STEMdiff™ Neural Rosette Selection Reagent will yield highly pure populations of neural progenitor cells, which can be further sub-cultured as single cells.
Subtype
Non-Enzymatic
Cell Type
Neural Cells, PSC-Derived, Pluripotent Stem Cells
Species
Human
Brand
STEMdiff
Area of Interest
Disease Modeling, Neuroscience, Stem Cell Biology

Protocols and Documentation

Find supporting information and directions for use in the Product Information Sheet or explore additional protocols below.

Document Type
Product Name
Catalog #
Lot #
Language
Catalog #
05832
Lot #
All
Language
English
Document Type
Technical Manual
Catalog #
05832
Lot #
All
Language
English
Document Type
Safety Data Sheet
Catalog #
05832
Lot #
All
Language
English

Applications

This product is designed for use in the following research area(s) as part of the highlighted workflow stage(s). Explore these workflows to learn more about the other products we offer to support each research area.

Resources and Publications

Publications (17)

A Novel Toolkit for Characterizing the Mechanical and Electrical Properties of Engineered Neural Tissues. M. Robinson et al. Biosensors 2019 apr

Abstract

We have designed and validated a set of robust and non-toxic protocols for directly evaluating the properties of engineered neural tissue. These protocols characterize the mechanical properties of engineered neural tissues and measure their electrophysical activity. The protocols obtain elastic moduli of very soft fibrin hydrogel scaffolds and voltage readings from motor neuron cultures. Neurons require soft substrates to differentiate and mature, however measuring the elastic moduli of soft substrates remains difficult to accurately measure using standard protocols such as atomic force microscopy or shear rheology. Here we validate a direct method for acquiring elastic modulus of fibrin using a modified Hertz model for thin films. In this method, spherical indenters are positioned on top of the fibrin samples, generating an indentation depth that is then correlated with elastic modulus. Neurons function by transmitting electrical signals to one another and being able to assess the development of electrical signaling serves is an important verification step when engineering neural tissues. We then validated a protocol wherein the electrical activity of motor neural cultures is measured directly by a voltage sensitive dye and a microplate reader without causing damage to the cells. These protocols provide a non-destructive method for characterizing the mechanical and electrical properties of living spinal cord tissues using novel biosensing methods.
Multiplication of the SNCA locus exacerbates neuronal nuclear aging. L. Tagliafierro et al. Human molecular genetics 2019

Abstract

Human-induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (hiPSC)-derived models have advanced the study of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD). While age is the strongest risk factor for these disorders, hiPSC-derived models represent rejuvenated neurons. We developed hiPSC-derived Aged dopaminergic and cholinergic neurons to model PD and related synucleinopathies. Our new method induces aging through a `semi-natural' process, by passaging multiple times at the Neural Precursor Cell stage, prior to final differentiation. Characterization of isogenic hiPSC-derived neurons using heterochromatin and nuclear envelope markers, as well as DNA damage and global DNA methylation, validated our age-inducing method. Next, we compared neurons derived from a patient with SNCA-triplication (SNCA-Tri) and a Control. The SNCA-Tri neurons displayed exacerbated nuclear aging, showing advanced aging signatures already at the Juvenile stage. Noteworthy, the Aged SNCA-Tri neurons showed more $\alpha$-synuclein aggregates per cell versus the Juvenile. We suggest a link between the effects of aging and SNCA overexpression on neuronal nuclear architecture.
Comparative characterization of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) derived from patients with schizophrenia and autism. L.-M. Grunwald et al. Translational psychiatry 2019

Abstract

Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) provide an attractive tool to study disease mechanisms of neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia. A pertinent problem is the development of hiPSC-based assays to discriminate schizophrenia (SZ) from autism spectrum disorder (ASD) models. Healthy control individuals as well as patients with SZ and ASD were examined by a panel of diagnostic tests. Subsequently, skin biopsies were taken for the generation, differentiation, and testing of hiPSC-derived neurons from all individuals. SZ and ASD neurons share a reduced capacity for cortical differentiation as shown by quantitative analysis of the synaptic marker PSD95 and neurite outgrowth. By contrast, pattern analysis of calcium signals turned out to discriminate among healthy control, schizophrenia, and autism samples. Schizophrenia neurons displayed decreased peak frequency accompanied by increased peak areas, while autism neurons showed a slight decrease in peak amplitudes. For further analysis of the schizophrenia phenotype, transcriptome analyses revealed a clear discrimination among schizophrenia, autism, and healthy controls based on differentially expressed genes. However, considerable differences were still evident among schizophrenia patients under inspection. For one individual with schizophrenia, expression analysis revealed deregulation of genes associated with the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC class II) presentation pathway. Interestingly, antipsychotic treatment of healthy control neurons also increased MHC class II expression. In conclusion, transcriptome analysis combined with pattern analysis of calcium signals appeared as a tool to discriminate between SZ and ASD phenotypes in vitro.

Contact STEMCELL Technologies

Our Customer Service, Sales, and Product and Scientific Support departments in North America are available between 6 am and 5 pm Pacific Time (9 am and 8 pm Eastern Time). One of our representatives will be happy to help you by telephone or email. Please complete the form to contact us by email. A representative will get back to you shortly.
  •  

StemCell Technologies Inc. and affiliates ("STEMCELL Technologies") does not share your email address with third parties. StemCell Technologies Inc. will use your email address to confirm your identity and send you newsletters, transaction-related emails, promotional and customer service emails in accordance with our privacy policy. You can change your email preferences at any time.