EasySep™ Dead Cell Removal (Annexin V) Kit

Immunomagnetic depletion cell isolation kit

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EasySep™ Dead Cell Removal (Annexin V) Kit

Immunomagnetic depletion of apoptotic (Annexin V+) cells from culture or tissue preparations

1 x 109 cells
Catalog #17899
398 USD

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Required Products

Overview

The EasySep™ Dead Cell Removal (Annexin V) kit is designed to deplete apoptotic (Annexin V+) cells from cell culture or tissue preparations by immunomagnetic negative selection. Unwanted cells are labeled with Annexin V, antibodies and magnetic particles, and separated without columns using an EasySep™ magnet. Labeled cells are separated using an EasySep™ magnet without the use of columns. Desired cells are simply poured off into a new tube. Annexin V binds phosphatidylserine on the outer leaflet of the cell membrane during apoptosis.
Advantages:
• Fast and easy-to-use
• No columns required
• Compatible across EasySep™, "The Big Easy", and EasyEights™ platforms
Components:
  • EasySep™ Dead Cell Removal (Annexin V) Kit (Catalog #17899)
    • EasySep™ Dead Cell Removal (Annexin V) Cocktail, 0.5 mL
    • EasySep ™ Biotin Selection Cocktail, 1 mL
    • EasySep™ Dextran RapidSpheres™ 50103, 1 mL
 
Magnet Compatibility:
• EasySep™ Magnet (Catalog #18000), or
• “The Big Easy” EasySep™ Magnet (Catalog #18001), or
• EasyEights™ EasySep™ Magnet (Catalog #18103)
 
Subtype:
Cell Isolation Kits
Cell Type:
Lymphocytes
Species:
Human; Mouse; Rat; Non-Human Primate; Other
Sample Source:
Cord Blood; Leukapheresis; Lung; Lymph Node; Other; Spleen
Selection Method:
Depletion
Brand:
EasySep
Area of Interest:
Immunology

Scientific Resources

Educational Materials

(6)

Data and Publications

Data

Starting with human polymorphonuclear cells (PMNCs) cultured overnight, the live cell content (AnnexinV-/PI-) of the enriched fraction is typically 69.7± 12.5% (mean ± SD using the purple EasySep™ Magnet). In the above example, the percentages of live cells in the start and final enriched fractions are 12.8% and 74.9%, respectively.

Starting with 24- to 48-hour-old mouse splenocytes, the live cell content of the enriched fraction is typically 79.8 ± 11.4% (mean ± SD using the purple EasySep™ Magnet). In the above example, the percentages of live cells in the start and final enriched fractions are 78.1% and 93.4%, respectively.

Publications

(1)
Nature microbiology 2020 jun

Exosome mimicry by a HAVCR1-NPC1 pathway of endosomal fusion mediates hepatitis A virus infection.

M. I. Costafreda et al.

Abstract

Cell-to-cell communication by exosomes controls normal and pathogenic processes1,2. Viruses can spread in exosomes and thereby avoid immune recognition3. While biogenesis, binding and uptake of exosomes are well characterized4,5, delivery of exosome cargo into the cytoplasm is poorly understood3. We report that the phosphatidylserine receptor HAVCR1 (refs. 6,7) and the cholesterol transporter NPC1 (ref. 8) participate in cargo delivery from exosomes of hepatitis A virus (HAV)-infected cells (exo-HAV) by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Using CRISPR-Cas9 knockout technology, we show that these two lipid receptors, which interact in the late endosome9, are necessary for the membrane fusion and delivery of RNA from exo-HAV into the cytoplasm. The HAVCR1-NPC1 pathway, which Ebola virus exploits to infect cells9, mediates HAV infection by exo-HAV, which indicates that viral infection via this exosome mimicry mechanism does not require an envelope glycoprotein. The capsid-free viral RNA in the exosome lumen, but not the endosomal uncoating of HAV particles contained in the exosomes, is mainly responsible for exo-HAV infectivity as assessed by methylene blue inactivation of non-encapsidated RNA. In contrast to exo-HAV, infectivity of HAV particles is pH-independent and requires HAVCR1 or another as yet unidentified receptor(s) but not NPC1. Our findings show that envelope-glycoprotein-independent fusion mechanisms are shared by exosomes and viruses, and call for a reassessment of the role of envelope glycoproteins in infection.
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