MesenCult™ MSC Basal Medium (Human)

Basal medium for human mesenchymal stem cells

MesenCult™ MSC Basal Medium (Human)

Basal medium for human mesenchymal stem cells

MesenCult™ MSC Basal Medium (Human)
450 mL
61 USD
Catalog # 05401

Basal medium for human mesenchymal stem cells

Products for Your Protocol
To see all required products for your protocol, please consult the Product Information Sheet.

Overview

MesenCult™ MSC Basal Medium (Human) is a standardized basal medium designed to be supplemented with MesenCult™ Mesenchymal Stem Cell Stimulatory Supplement (Human; Catalog #05402) for the in vitro culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MesenCult™ MSC Basal Medium is a component of MesenCult™ Proliferation Kit (Human; Catalog #05411), and is also available separately.
Subtype
Basal Media
Cell Type
Mesenchymal Stem and Progenitor Cells
Species
Human
Application
Cell Culture, Colony Assay, Expansion
Brand
MesenCult
Area of Interest
Stem Cell Biology

Scientific Resources

Product Documentation

Find supporting information and directions for use in the Product Information Sheet or explore additional protocols below.

Document Type
Product Name
Catalog #
Lot #
Language
Catalog #
05401
Lot #
All
Language
English
Document Type
Safety Data Sheet
Catalog #
05401
Lot #
All
Language
English

Product Applications

This product is designed for use in the following research area(s) as part of the highlighted workflow stage(s). Explore these workflows to learn more about the other products we offer to support each research area.

Data and Publications

Publications (48)

FAK Deficiency in Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Alters Their Homeostasis and Drives Abnormal Proliferation and Differentiation of Haematopoietic Stem Cells. Y. Wu et al. Cells 2020 mar

Abstract

Emerging evidence indicates that in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment may also contribute to the ineffective, malignant haematopoiesis in addition to the intrinsic abnormalities of haematopoietic stem precursor cells (HSPCs). The BM microenvironment influences malignant haematopoiesis through indirect mechanisms, but the processes by which the BM microenvironment directly contributes to MDS initiation and progression have not yet been elucidated. Our previous data showed that BM-derived stromal cells (BMSCs) from MDS patients have an abnormal expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). In this study, we characterise the morpho-phenotypic features and the functional alterations of BMSCs from MDS patients and in FAK knock-downed HS-5 cells. The decreased expression of FAK or its phosphorylated form in BMSCs from low-risk (LR) MDS directly correlates with BMSCs' functional deficiency and is associated with a reduced level of haemoglobin. The downregulation of FAK in HS-5 cells alters their morphology, proliferation, and differentiation capabilities and impairs the expression of several adhesion molecules. In addition, we examine the CD34+ healthy donor (HD)-derived HSPCs' properties when co-cultured with FAK-deficient BMSCs. Both abnormal proliferation and the impaired erythroid differentiation capacity of HD-HSPCs were observed. Together, these results demonstrate that stromal adhesion mechanisms mediated by FAK are crucial for regulating HSPCs' homeostasis.
Icariin protects rabbit BMSCs against OGD-induced apoptosis by inhibiting ERs-mediated autophagy via MAPK signaling pathway. D. Liu et al. Life sciences 2020 jul

Abstract

Stem cell therapy is widely employed in treating osteoarthritis (OA), and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) has gradually become the most attractive new method for treating OA due to the benefit for cartilage tissue repair. However, the apoptosis in the neural stem cell transplantation severely decreases repairing efficacy. Icariin has been reported to exert multiple effects on BMSCs, including its proliferation, osteogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation. However, its effects on the injury induced by oxygen, glucose and serum deprivation (OGD) remains unknown. We prospectively investigated the role of ICA on rabbit BMSCs under conditions of OGD. Firstly, BMSCs were cultured under conditions of OGD, ICA relieved OGD-induced cell damage by promoting cell proliferation and suppressing apoptosis. Secondly, Markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERs), ER stress IRE-1 pathway, and autophagy were both inhibited by ICA via inhibition of phosphor-extracellular regulated protein kinases (p-ERKs), p-P38, p-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK) or si-MAPK. Finally, decrease of ERs marker levels enhanced protective effect of ICA against OGD-induced injury by limiting apoptosis and autophagy. Moreover, an autophagy inhibitor (3-methyladenine: 3-MA) contributed to a synergistic effect in conjunction with ICA, in promoting cell proliferation, suggesting that ICA exerts anti-ERs and anti-autophagy effects in OGD-treated BMSCs. Therefore, ICA protected rabbit BMSCs from OGD-induced apoptosis through inhibitory regulation of ERs-mediated autophagy related to the MAPK signaling pathway, which provided insights for a potential therapeutic strategy in OA.
Isolation of adipose tissue derived regenerative cells from human subcutaneous tissue with or without the use of an enzymatic reagent. G. E. Winnier et al. PloS one 2019

Abstract

Freshly isolated, uncultured, autologous adipose derived regenerative cells (ADRCs) have emerged as a promising tool for regenerative cell therapy. The Transpose RT system (InGeneron, Inc., Houston, TX, USA) is a system for isolating ADRCs from adipose tissue, commercially available in Europe as a CE-marked medical device and under clinical evaluation in the United States. This system makes use of the proprietary, enzymatic Matrase Reagent for isolating cells. The present study addressed the question whether the use of Matrase Reagent influences cell yield, cell viability, live cell yield, biological characteristics, physiological functions or structural properties of the ADRCs in final cell suspension. Identical samples of subcutaneous adipose tissue from 12 subjects undergoing elective lipoplasty were processed either with or without the use of Matrase Reagent. Then, characteristics of the ADRCs in the respective final cell suspensions were evaluated. Compared to non-enzymatic isolation, enzymatic isolation resulted in approximately twelve times higher mean cell yield (i.e., numbers of viable cells/ml lipoaspirate) and approximately 16 times more colony forming units. Despite these differences, cells isolated from lipoaspirate both with and without the use of Matrase Reagent were independently able to differentiate into cells of all three germ layers. This indicates that biological characteristics, physiological functions or structural properties relevant for the intended use were not altered or induced using Matrase Reagent. A comprehensive literature review demonstrated that isolation of ADRCs from lipoaspirate using the Transpose RT system and the Matrase Reagent results in the highest viable cell yield among published data regarding isolation of ADRCs from lipoaspirate.

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