RosetteSep™ Human CD4+ T Cell Enrichment Cocktail

Immunodensity negative selection cocktail

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Immunodensity negative selection cocktail
From: 179 USD

New look, same high quality and support! You may notice that your instrument or reagent packaging looks slightly different from images displayed on the website, or from previous orders. We are updating our look but rest assured, the products themselves and how you should use them have not changed. Learn more

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Overview

The RosetteSep™ Human CD4+ T Cell Enrichment Cocktail is designed to isolate CD4+ T cells from whole blood by negative selection. Unwanted cells are targeted for removal with Tetrameric Antibody Complexes recognizing non-CD4+ T cells and glycophorin A on red blood cells (RBCs). When centrifuged over a buoyant density medium such as RosetteSep™ DM-L (Catalog #15705) or Lymphoprep™ (Catalog #07801), the unwanted cells pellet along with the RBCs. The purified CD4+ T cells are present as a highly enriched population at the interface between the plasma and the buoyant density medium.
Advantages:
• Fast and easy-to-use
• Requires no special equipment or training
• Isolated cells are untouched
• Can be combined with SepMate™ for consistent, high-throughput sample processing
Components:
  • RosetteSep™ Human CD4+ T Cell Enrichment Cocktail (Catalog #15022)
    • RosetteSep™ Human CD4+ T Cell Enrichment Cocktail, 2 mL
  • RosetteSep™ Human CD4+ T Cell Enrichment Cocktail (Catalog #15062)
    • RosetteSep™ Human CD4+ T Cell Enrichment Cocktail, 5 x 2 mL
Subtype:
Cell Isolation Kits
Cell Type:
T Cells; T Cells, CD4+
Species:
Human
Sample Source:
Buffy Coat; Whole Blood
Selection Method:
Negative
Application:
Cell Isolation
Brand:
RosetteSep
Area of Interest:
Cell Therapy; Immunology

Scientific Resources

Educational Materials

(10)

Frequently Asked Questions

What is RosetteSep™?

RosetteSep™ is a rapid cell separation procedure for the isolation of purified cells directly from whole blood, without columns or magnets.

How does RosetteSep™ work?

The antibody cocktail crosslinks unwanted cells to red blood cells (RBCs), forming rosettes. The unwanted cells then pellet with the free RBCs when centrifuged over a density centrifugation medium (e.g. Ficoll-Paque™ PLUS, Lymphoprep™).

What factors affect cell recovery?

The temperature of the reagents can affect cell recovery. All reagents should be at room temperature (sample, density centrifugation medium, PBS, centrifuge) before performing the isolations. Layering can also affect recovery so be sure to carefully layer the sample to avoid mixing with the density centrifugation medium as much as possible. Be sure to collect the entire enriched culture without disturbing the RBC pellet. A small amount of density centrifugation medium can be collected without worry.

Which cell samples can RosetteSep™ be used with?

RosetteSep™ can be used with leukapheresis samples, bone marrow or buffy coat, as long as: the concentration of cells does not exceed 5 x 107 per mL (can dilute if necessary); and there are at least 100 RBCs for every nucleated cell (RBCs can be added if necessary).

Can RosetteSep™ be used with previously frozen or cultured cells?

Yes. Cells should be re-suspended at 2 - 5 x 107 cells / mL in PBS + 2% FBS. Fresh whole blood should be added at 250 µL per mL of sample, as a source of red cells.

Can RosetteSep™ be used to enrich progenitors from cord blood?

Yes. Sometimes cord blood contains immature nucleated red cells that have a lower density than mature RBCs. These immature red cells do not pellet over Ficoll™, which can lead to a higher RBC contamination than peripheral blood separations.

Does RosetteSep™ work with mouse cells?

No, but we have developed EasySep™, a magnetic-based cell isolation system which works with mouse and other non-human species.

Which anticoagulant should be used with RosetteSep™?

Peripheral blood should be collected in heparinized Vacutainers. Cord blood should be collected in ACD.

Should the anticoagulant be washed off before using RosetteSep™?

No, the antibody cocktail can be added directly to the sample.
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Product Applications

This product is designed for use in the following research area(s) as part of the highlighted workflow stage(s). Explore these workflows to learn more about the other products we offer to support each research area.

Data and Publications

Data

FACS Histogram Results Using RosetteSep™ Human CD4+ T Cell Enrichment Cocktail

Figure 1. FACS Histogram Results Using RosetteSep™ Human CD4+ T Cell Enrichment Cocktail

Starting with fresh peripheral blood, the CD4+ cell content of the enriched fraction is typically 94 ± 5%.

Publications

(57)
Scientific Reports 2020 jan

Potent inhibition of HIV replication in primary human cells by novel synthetic polyketides inspired by Aureothin

A. Herrmann et al.

Abstract

Overcoming the global health threat of HIV infection requires continuous pipelines of novel drug candidates. We identified the $\gamma$-pyrone polyketides Aureothin/Neoaureothin as potent hits by anti-HIV screening of an extensive natural compound collection. Total synthesis of a structurally diverse group of Aureothin-derivatives successfully identified a lead compound ({\#}7) superior to Aureothin that combines strong anti-HIV activity (IC90{\textless}45 nM), photostability and improved cell safety. Compound {\#}7 inhibited de novo virus production from integrated proviruses by blocking the accumulation of HIV RNAs that encode the structural components of virions and include viral genomic RNAs. Thus, the mode-of-action displayed by compound {\#}7 is different from those of all current clinical drugs. Proteomic analysis indicated that compound {\#}7 does not affect global protein expression in primary blood cells and may modulate cellular pathways linked to HIV infection. Compound {\#}7 inhibited multiple HIV genotypes, including HIV-type 1 and 2 and synergistically inhibited HIV in combination with clinical reverse transcriptase and integrase inhibitors. We conclude that compound {\#}7 represents a promising new class of HIV inhibitors that will facilitate the identification of new virus-host interactions exploitable for antiviral attack and holds promise for further drug development.
Cell reports 2020 feb

Nef-Mediated CD3-TCR Downmodulation Dampens Acute Inflammation and Promotes SIV Immune Evasion.

S. Joas et al.

Abstract

The inability of Nef to downmodulate the CD3-T cell receptor (TCR) complex distinguishes HIV-1 from other primate lentiviruses and may contribute to its high virulence. However, the role of this Nef function in virus-mediated immune activation and pathogenicity remains speculative. Here, we selectively disrupted this Nef activity in SIVmac239 and analyzed the consequences for the virological, immunological, and clinical outcome of infection in rhesus macaques. The inability to downmodulate CD3-TCR does not impair viral replication during acute infection but is associated with increased immune activation and antiviral gene expression. Subsequent early reversion in three of six animals suggests strong selective pressure for this Nef function and is associated with high viral loads and progression to simian AIDS. In the absence of reversions, however, viral replication and the clinical course of infection are attenuated. Thus, Nef-mediated downmodulation of CD3 dampens the inflammatory response to simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection and seems critical for efficient viral immune evasion.
Science signaling 2019 apr

Cooperation between T cell receptor and Toll-like receptor 5 signaling for CD4+ T cell activation.

O. Rodr\'iguez-Jorge et al.

Abstract

CD4+ T cells recognize antigens through their T cell receptors (TCRs); however, additional signals involving costimulatory receptors, for example, CD28, are required for proper T cell activation. Alternative costimulatory receptors have been proposed, including members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, such as TLR5 and TLR2. To understand the molecular mechanism underlying a potential costimulatory role for TLR5, we generated detailed molecular maps and logical models for the TCR and TLR5 signaling pathways and a merged model for cross-interactions between the two pathways. Furthermore, we validated the resulting model by analyzing how T cells responded to the activation of these pathways alone or in combination, in terms of the activation of the transcriptional regulators CREB, AP-1 (c-Jun), and NF-kappaB (p65). Our merged model accurately predicted the experimental results, showing that the activation of TLR5 can play a similar role to that of CD28 activation with respect to AP-1, CREB, and NF-kappaB activation, thereby providing insights regarding the cross-regulation of these pathways in CD4+ T cells.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 2017 OCT

Gut microbiota from multiple sclerosis patients enables spontaneous autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice.

Berer K et al.

Abstract

There is emerging evidence that the commensal microbiota has a role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), a putative autoimmune disease of the CNS. Here, we compared the gut microbial composition of 34 monozygotic twin pairs discordant for MS. While there were no major differences in the overall microbial profiles, we found a significant increase in some taxa such as Akkermansia in untreated MS twins. Furthermore, most notably, when transplanted to a transgenic mouse model of spontaneous brain autoimmunity, MS twin-derived microbiota induced a significantly higher incidence of autoimmunity than the healthy twin-derived microbiota. The microbial profiles of the colonized mice showed a high intraindividual and remarkable temporal stability with several differences, including Sutterella, an organism shown to induce a protective immunoregulatory profile in vitro. Immune cells from mouse recipients of MS-twin samples produced less IL-10 than immune cells from mice colonized with healthy-twin samples. IL-10 may have a regulatory role in spontaneous CNS autoimmunity, as neutralization of the cytokine in mice colonized with healthy-twin fecal samples increased disease incidence. These findings provide evidence that MS-derived microbiota contain factors that precipitate an MS-like autoimmune disease in a transgenic mouse model. They hence encourage the detailed search for protective and pathogenic microbial components in human MS.
Clinical reviews in allergy & immunology 2017 MAY

Response to Treatment with TNFα Inhibitors in Rheumatoid Arthritis Is Associated with High Levels of GM-CSF and GM-CSF(+) T Lymphocytes.

Bystrom J et al.

Abstract

Biologic TNFα inhibitors are a mainstay treatment option for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) refractory to other treatment options. However, many patients either do not respond or relapse after initially responding to these agents. This study was carried out to identify biomarkers that can distinguish responder from non-responder patients before the initiation of treatment. The level of cytokines in plasma and those produced by ex vivo T cells, B cells and monocytes in 97 RA patients treated with biologic TNFα inhibitors was measured before treatment and after 1 and 3 months of treatment by multiplex analyses. The frequency of T cell subsets and intracellular cytokines were determined by flow cytometry. The results reveal that pre-treatment, T cells from patients who went on to respond to treatment with biologic anti-TNFα agents produced significantly more GM-CSF than non-responder patients. Furthermore, immune cells from responder patients produced higher levels of IL-1β, TNFα and IL-6. Cytokine profiling in the blood of patients confirmed the association between high levels of GM-CSF and responsiveness to biologic anti-TNFα agents. Thus, high blood levels of GM-CSF pre-treatment had a positive predictive value of 87.5% (61.6 to 98.5% at 95% CI) in treated RA patients. The study also shows that cells from most anti-TNFα responder patients in the current cohort produced higher levels of GM-CSF and TNFα pre-treatment than non-responder patients. Findings from the current study and our previous observations that non-responsiveness to anti-TNFα is associated with high IL-17 levels suggest that the disease in responder and non-responder RA patients is likely to be driven/sustained by different inflammatory pathways. The use of biomarker signatures of distinct pro-inflammatory pathways could lead to evidence-based prescription of the most appropriate biological therapies for different RA patients.
PRODUCTS ARE FOR RESEARCH USE ONLY AND NOT INTENDED FOR HUMAN OR ANIMAL DIAGNOSTIC OR THERAPEUTIC USES UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON QUALITY AT STEMCELL, REFER TO WWW.STEMCELL.COM/COMPLIANCE.