MethoCult™ GF M3434

Methylcellulose-based medium with recombinant cytokines (including EPO) for mouse cells

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Methylcellulose-based medium with recombinant cytokines (including EPO) for mouse cells
From: 505 USD

Overview

MethoCult™ GF M3434 is optimized for the growth and enumeration of hematopoietic progenitor cells in colony-forming unit (CFU) assays of mouse bone marrow, spleen, peripheral blood, and fetal liver cells. MethoCult™ GF M3434 has been formulated to support optimal growth of primitive erythroid progenitor cells (BFU-E), granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (CFU-GM, CFU-G and CFU-M), and multi-potential granulocyte, erythroid, macrophage, megakaryocyte progenitor cells (CFU-GEMM). This formulation is compatible with STEMvision™ software for automated colony counting of mouse bone marrow CFU assays.
Contains:
• Methylcellulose in Iscove's MDM
• Fetal bovine serum
• Bovine serum albumin
• Recombinant human insulin
• Human transferrin (iron-saturated)
• 2-Mercaptoethanol
• Recombinant mouse stem cell factor (SCF)
• Recombinant mouse interleukin 3 (IL-3)
• Recombinant human interleukin 6 (IL-6)
• Recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO)
• Supplements
Subtype:
Semi-Solid Media; Specialized Media
Cell Type:
Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells
Species:
Mouse
Application:
Cell Culture; Colony Assay; Functional Assay
Brand:
MethoCult
Area of Interest:
Stem Cell Biology

Scientific Resources

Product Documentation

Educational Materials

(6)

Frequently Asked Questions

Why use semi-solid media?

Semi-solid media (methylcellulose-based MethoCult™ and collagen-based MegaCult™-C) allow the clonal progeny of a single progenitor cell to remain spatially isolated from other colonies within a culture, so they may be separately identified and counted.

Why use methylcellulose-based media?

Methylcellulose permits better growth of erythroid colonies than other types of semi-solid support systems (eg. agar) while allowing optimal myeloid colony formation. When appropriate cytokines are present, committed progenitor cells of both erythroid and granulocyte/macrophage lineages (CFU-GM, CFU-G, CFU-M) as well as multi-potential progenitor cells (CFU-GEMM), can be assayed simultaneously in the same culture dish.

Is it necessary to add antibiotics to the media?

No, aseptic technique should be sufficient to maintain sterile cultures. However, antibiotics (eg. Penicillin/Streptomycin) or anti-fungals (eg. Amphotericin B) may be added to the methylcellulose medium if desired.

Is there anything I can do if my cultures appear contaminated?

No, once contamination is visible, it is not possible to rescue the cultures by the addition of antibiotics. Bacteria and yeast inhibit colony formation by depleting nutrients or by releasing toxic substances.

Why can't I use a pipette to dispense methylcellulose-based media?

Methylcellulose is a viscous solution that cannot be accurately dispensed using a pipette due to adherence of the medium to the walls of the pipette tip. Blunt-End, 16 Gauge needles (Catalog #28110), in combination with 3 cc Syringes (Catalog #28230) are recommended for accurate dispensing of MethoCult™.

Can I 'pluck' the colonies for individual analysis?

Yes, colonies can be 'plucked' using a pipette with 200 µL sterile pipette tips or using a glass Pasteur pipette with an elongated tip. Individual colonies should be placed in a volume of 25 - 50 µL of medium, and diluted into suitable culture medium for further culture or analysis.

Why are low adherence dishes so important?

Adherent cells such as fibroblasts can cause inhibition of colony growth and obscure visualization of colonies.

Can MethoCult™ products be used for lymphoid progenitor CFU assays?

Human lymphoid progenitors (B, NK and T) seem to require stromal support for growth therefore cannot be grown in MethoCult™. Mouse pre-B clonogenic progenitors can be grown in MethoCult™ M3630 (Catalog #03630).

Is it possible to set up CFU assays in a 24-well plate?

Yes, as long as a plating concentration optimized for the smaller surface area of a well in a 24-well plate (1.9 cm2 as compared to ~9.5 cm2 for a 35 mm dish) is used for these assays. The number of replicate wells required to get an accurate estimation of CFU numbers may also need to be increased.

Can I stain colonies in MethoCult™ medium?

The cells in individual colonies in MethoCult™ can be stained, eg., for analysis of morphology or phenotype, after they are plucked from the dish and washed free of methylcellulose. Colonies grown in collagen-based MegaCult™-C medium can be used for immunohistochemical or enzymatic staining in situ after dehydration and fixation onto glass slides.

Are there differences in colony morphology with serum-free media?

Serum-containing media generally give better overall growth (colonies may appear larger) but there are no large differences in total colony numbers when CFU assays using serum-free media and serum-containing media are compared, provided that identical cytokines are present.

Can MethoCult™ be made with alternate base media?

Yes, this can be done as a 'custom' media order. Please contact techsupport@stemcell.com for more information.

Is there a MethoCult™ formulation suitable for HPP-CFC (high proliferative potential colony forming cell)?

Yes, MethoCult™ H4535 (Catalog #04535) can be used for the HPP-CFC assay as it does not contain EPO. The culture period is usually 28 days. It is not necessary to feed these cultures as growth factors in the medium are present in excess. As HPP-CFCs can be quite large, overplating can be a problem. It is recommended to plate cells at two or more different concentrations.
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Product Applications

This product is designed for use in the following research area(s) as part of the highlighted workflow stage(s). Explore these workflows to learn more about the other products we offer to support each research area.

Data and Publications

Data

Procedure Summary for Hematopoietic CFU Assays

Figure 1. Procedure Summary for Hematopoietic CFU Assays

Examples of Colonies Derived from Mouse Hematopoietic Progenitors

Figure 2. Examples of Colonies Derived from Mouse Hematopoietic Progenitors

Publications

(159)
Nature communications 2018 JUN

miR-143/145 differentially regulate hematopoietic stem and progenitor activity through suppression of canonical TGFbeta$ signaling.

J. Lam et al.

Abstract

Expression of miR-143 and miR-145 is reduced in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) of myelodysplastic syndrome patients with a deletion in the long arm of chromosome 5. Here we show that mice lacking miR-143/145 have impaired HSPC activity with depletion of functional hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but activation of progenitor cells (HPCs). We identify components of the transforming growth factor beta$ (TGFbeta$) pathway as key targets of miR-143/145. Enforced expression of the TGFbeta$ adaptor protein and miR-145 target, Disabled-2 (DAB2), recapitulates the HSC defect seen in miR-143/145-/- mice. Despite reduced HSC activity, older miR-143/145-/- and DAB2-expressing mice show elevated leukocyte counts associated with increased HPC activity. A subset of mice develop a serially transplantable myeloid malignancy, associated with expansion of HPC. Thus, miR-143/145 play a cell context-dependent role in HSPC function through regulation of TGFbeta$/DAB2 activation, and loss of these miRNAs creates a preleukemic state.
The Journal of experimental medicine 2015 MAY

Biomechanical forces promote blood development through prostaglandin E2 and the cAMP-PKA signaling axis.

Diaz MF et al.

Abstract

Blood flow promotes emergence of definitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the developing embryo, yet the signals generated by hemodynamic forces that influence hematopoietic potential remain poorly defined. Here we show that fluid shear stress endows long-term multilineage engraftment potential upon early hematopoietic tissues at embryonic day 9.5, an embryonic stage not previously described to harbor HSCs. Effects on hematopoiesis are mediated in part by a cascade downstream of wall shear stress that involves calcium efflux and stimulation of the prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling axis. Blockade of the PGE2-cAMP-PKA pathway in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) abolished enhancement in hematopoietic activity. Furthermore, Ncx1 heartbeat mutants, as well as static cultures of AGM, exhibit lower levels of expression of prostaglandin synthases and reduced phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Similar to flow-exposed cultures, transient treatment of AGM with the synthetic analogue 16,16-dimethyl-PGE2 stimulates more robust engraftment of adult recipients and greater lymphoid reconstitution. These data provide one mechanism by which biomechanical forces induced by blood flow modulate hematopoietic potential.
Mutagenesis 2011 MAY

NADPH oxidase inhibition attenuates total body irradiation-induced haematopoietic genomic instability.

Pazhanisamy SK et al.

Abstract

Ionising radiation (IR) is a known carcinogen and poses a significant risk to the haematopoietic system for the development of leukaemia in part by induction of genomic instability. Induction of chronic oxidative stress has been assumed to play an important role in mediating the effect of IR on the haematopoietic system. However, there was no direct evidence to support this hypothesis prior to our studies. In our recent studies, we showed that exposure of mice to total body irradiation (TBI) induces persistent oxidative stress selectively in haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) at least in part via up-regulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NOX) 4. Now, we found that post-TBI treatment with diphenylene iodonium (DPI), a pan NOX inhibitor, not only significantly reduces TBI-induced increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, oxidative DNA damage and DNA double-strand breaks in HSCs but also dramatically decreases the number of cells with unstable chromosomal aberrations in the clonal progeny of irradiated HSCs. The effects of DPI are comparable to Mn (III) meso-tetrakis (N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl) porphyrin, a superoxide dismutase mimetic and a potent antioxidant. These findings demonstrate that increased production of ROS by NOX in HSCs mediates the induction of haematopoietic genomic instability by IR and that NOX may represent a novel molecular target to inhibit TBI-induced genomic instability.
Blood 2011 MAY

The EMT regulator Zeb2/Sip1 is essential for murine embryonic hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell differentiation and mobilization.

Goossens S et al.

Abstract

Zeb2 (Sip1/Zfhx1b) is a member of the zinc-finger E-box-binding (ZEB) family of transcriptional repressors previously demonstrated to regulate epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes during embryogenesis and tumor progression. We found high Zeb2 mRNA expression levels in HSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs), and examined Zeb2 function in hematopoiesis through a conditional deletion approach using the Tie2-Cre and Vav-iCre recombination mouse lines. Detailed cellular analysis demonstrated that Zeb2 is dispensable for hematopoietic cluster and HSC formation in the aorta-gonadomesonephros region of the embryo, but is essential for normal HSC/HPC differentiation. In addition, Zeb2-deficient HSCs/HPCs fail to properly colonize the fetal liver and/or bone marrow and show enhanced adhesive properties associated with increased β1 integrin and Cxcr4 expression. Moreover, deletion of Zeb2 resulted in embryonic (Tie2-Cre) and perinatal (Vav-icre) lethality due to severe cephalic hemorrhaging and decreased levels of angiopoietin-1 and, subsequently, improper pericyte coverage of the cephalic vasculature. These results reveal essential roles for Zeb2 in embryonic hematopoiesis and are suggestive of a role for Zeb2 in hematopoietic-related pathologies in the adult.
Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950) 2011 MAY

Chronic exposure to a TLR ligand injures hematopoietic stem cells.

Esplin BL et al.

Abstract

Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) can be harmed by disease, chemotherapy, radiation, and normal aging. We show in this study that damage also occurs in mice repeatedly treated with very low doses of LPS. Overall health of the animals was good, and there were relatively minor changes in marrow hematopoietic progenitors. However, HSC were unable to maintain quiescence, and transplantation revealed them to be myeloid skewed. Moreover, HSC from treated mice were not sustained in serial transplants and produced lymphoid progenitors with low levels of the E47 transcription factor. This phenomenon was previously seen in normal aging. Screening identified mAbs that resolve HSC subsets, and relative proportions of these HSC changed with age and/or chronic LPS treatment. For example, minor CD150(Hi)CD48(-) populations lacking CD86 or CD18 expanded. Simultaneous loss of CD150(Lo/-)CD48(-) HSC and gain of the normally rare subsets, in parallel with diminished transplantation potential, would be consistent with age- or TLR-related injury. In contrast, HSC in old mice differed from those in LPS-treated animals with respect to VCAM-1 or CD41 expression and lacked proliferation abnormalities. HSC can be exposed to endogenous and pathogen-derived TLR ligands during persistent low-grade infections. This stimulation might contribute in part to HSC senescence and ultimately compromise immunity.
STEMCELL TECHNOLOGIES INC.’S QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IS CERTIFIED TO ISO 13485. PRODUCTS ARE FOR RESEARCH USE ONLY AND NOT INTENDED FOR HUMAN OR ANIMAL DIAGNOSTIC OR THERAPEUTIC USES UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED.