MesenCult™ Expansion Kit (Mouse)

For the culture of mouse MSCs and MEFs

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MesenCult™ Expansion Kit (Mouse)

For the culture of mouse MSCs and MEFs

MesenCult™ Expansion Kit (Mouse)
1 Kit
281 USD
Catalog # 05513

For the culture of mouse MSCs and MEFs

Product Advantages


  • Fast expansion of mouse MSCs with robust enrichment as early as passage 0.

  • Optimized for use with mouse bone marrow-, compact bone- and adipose-derived MSCs and MEFs.

  • Obtain homogeneous mouse MSC cultures while maintaining tri-lineage differentiation potential.

  • Rigorous raw material screening and quality control minimize lot-to-lot variability and increase reproducibility between experiments.

What's Included

  • MesenCult™ Basal Medium (Mouse), 450 mL
  • MesenCult™ 10X Supplement (Mouse), 50 mL
  • MesenPure™, 0.5 mL
You may notice that your reagent packaging looks slightly different from images displayed here or from previous orders. Due to pandemic-related plasticware shortages, we are temporarily using alternative bottles for this product. Rest assured that the products themselves and how you should use them have not changed.
Products for Your Protocol
To see all required products for your protocol, please consult the Protocols and Documentation.

Overview

MesenCult™ Expansion Kit (Mouse) is standardized for the culture of mouse mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs; also known as mesenchymal stem cells) and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). The kit includes MesenCult™ Basal Medium (Mouse), MesenCult™ 10X Supplement (Mouse), and MesenPure™. MesenCult™ Expansion Medium has been optimized for the derivation and expansion of mouse MSCs and MEFs in vitro as well as for the detection of colony-forming unit–fibroblasts (CFU­F). This kit was optimized using cells from the mouse strain C57BL/6.
To facilitate the enrichment of MSCs and MEFs during cell culture without serial passaging and frequent medium changes, simply add MesenPure™ to complete MesenCult™ Expansion Medium just prior to use. Although not required, the addition of MesenPure™ is strongly recommended, as the resulting MSC and MEF cultures are more homogeneous and exhibit more robust proliferation, differentiation, and colony formation when compared to complete MesenCult™ Expansion Medium alone.
NOTE: MesenCult™ Expansion Medium must be supplemented with L-Glutamine (Catalog #07100).
Subtype
Specialized Media
Cell Type
Mesenchymal Stem and Progenitor Cells, Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts
Species
Mouse
Application
Cell Culture, Colony Assay, Expansion
Brand
MesenCult
Area of Interest
Stem Cell Biology

Data Figures

Procedure Summary for Hematopoietic CFU Assays

Figure 1. CFU-F Assay Comparing Mouse Bone Marrow (BM) MSCs Derived and Cultured in MesenCult™ Expansion Medium With and Without MesenPure™, and Other Commercially Available Media

Numerous CFU-F colonies were observed in cultures maintained in (A) MesenCult™ Expansion Medium (Control) and in (B) same medium containing MesenPure™. Few to no colony formation were observed when cultures were maintained in (C) Commercial Medium 1 or (D) Commercial Medium 2. Seeding density: 5x10^4 cells/cm^2.

Procedure Summary for Hematopoietic CFU Assays

Figure 2. Long-Term Expansion of Mouse BM-Derived MSCs is Observed When Cells are Cultured in MesenCult™ Expansion Medium

Mouse BM MSCs, derived and cultured in MesenCult™ Expansion Medium (Control), show superior long-term expansion rate compared to Commercial Medium 1 and 2. The addition of MesenPure™ enriches for MSCs as early as passage 0 and further improves the expansion rate beyond passage 8. The doubling time of mouse MSCs cultured with or without MesenPure™ are 2.29 and 3.01, respectively. BM MSCs culture-expanded using the MesenCult™ Expansion Kit, with or without MesenPure™, were done under hypoxic conditions. BM MSCs culture-expanded in Commercial Medium 1 and 2 were culture-expanded under normoxic conditions as recommended by their protocols. Data shown from one representative experiment (n=3).

Procedure Summary for Hematopoietic CFU Assays

Figure 3. Mouse BM- and Compact Bone (CB)-Derived MSCs Culture-expanded in MesenCult™ Expansion Medium With or Without MesenPure™ Maintain Multi-Lineage Differentiation Potential

Enriched populations of MSCs were observed at earlier passages upon addition of MesenPure™, which showed increased and more dense differentiation than control cultures. (A) Mouse BM MSCs culture-expanded in MesenCult™ Expansion Medium (Control) differentiated into (B) adipocytes; and (C) osteoblasts. (D) Mouse BM-derived MSCs culture-expanded with MesenPure™ differentiated into (E) adipocytes; and (F) osteoblasts . Differentiation of mouse BM MSCs into chondrocytes is in progress. (G) Mouse CB MSCs culture-expanded in MesenCult™ Expansion Medium (Control) differentiated into (H) adipocytes, (I) osteoblasts and (J) chondrocytes. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem and progenitor cells, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) were derived and culture-expanded using the MesenCult™ Expansion Kit. These cells were also differentiated towards the adipogenic and osteogenic lineages (data not shown). Adipocytes were stained with Oil Red O staining. Osteoblasts were stained with Alkaline phosphatase and silver nitrate (von Kossa). Chondrocytes were stained with Alcian Blue and Nuclear Fast Red. Images were taken at passage 2.

Procedure Summary for Hematopoietic CFU Assays

Figure 4. Flow Cytometric Analysis of Culture-Expanded Mouse BM-Derived MSCs Using the MesenCult™ Expansion Kit

Mouse BM MSCs were culture-expanded in MesenCult™ Expansion Medium (Control) or with MesenPure™. MSCs from passage 2 were stained for the mesenchymal surface markers, CD106 and Sca1, and the hematopoietic marker, CD45. Stained cells were then analyzed by flow cytometry. MSCs culture-expanded in Control medium show distinct populations of CD45+ hematopoietic cells and CD45- (CD106+ and Sca1+) MSCs. Upon addition of MesenPure™ to the Control Medium, an enriched and homogenous population of CD45- (CD106+ and Sca1+) MSCs are obtained.

Protocols and Documentation

Find supporting information and directions for use in the Product Information Sheet or explore additional protocols below.

Document Type
Product Name
Catalog #
Lot #
Language
Catalog #
05513
Lot #
All
Language
English
Document Type
Safety Data Sheet 1
Catalog #
05513
Lot #
All
Language
English
Document Type
Safety Data Sheet 2
Catalog #
05513
Lot #
All
Language
English
Document Type
Safety Data Sheet 3
Catalog #
05513
Lot #
All
Language
English

Applications

This product is designed for use in the following research area(s) as part of the highlighted workflow stage(s). Explore these workflows to learn more about the other products we offer to support each research area.

Resources and Publications

Publications (16)

Loss of KDM4B exacerbates bone-fat imbalance and mesenchymal stromal cell exhaustion in skeletal aging. P. Deng et al. Cell stem cell 2021 feb

Abstract

Skeletal aging is a complex process, characterized by a decrease in bone formation, an increase in marrow fat, and stem cell exhaustion. Loss of H3K9me3, a heterochromatin mark, has been proposed to be associated with aging. Here, we report that loss of KDM4B in mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) exacerbated skeletal aging and osteoporosis by reducing bone formation and increasing marrow adiposity via increasing H3K9me3. KDM4B epigenetically coordinated $\beta$-catenin/Smad1-mediated transcription by removing repressive H3K9me3. Importantly, KDM4B ablation impaired MSC self-renewal and promoted MSC exhaustion by inducing senescence-associated heterochromatin foci formation, providing a mechanistic explanation for stem cell exhaustion with aging. Moreover, while KDM4B was required for parathyroid hormone-mediated bone anabolism, KDM4B depletion accelerated bone loss and marrow adiposity induced by a high-fat diet. Our results suggest that the epigenetic rejuvenation and reversing bone-fat imbalance might be new strategies for preventing and treating skeletal aging and osteoporosis by activating KDM4B in MSCs.
Aging-Related Reduced Expression of CXCR4 on Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Contributes to Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Defects. P. Singh et al. Stem cell reviews and reports 2020 may

Abstract

Aging impairs the regenerative potential of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and skews differentiation towards the myeloid lineage. The bone marrow (BM) microenvironment has recently been suggested to influence HSC aging, however the mechanisms whereby BM stromal cells mediate this effect is unknown. Here we show that aging-associated decreased expression of CXCR4 expression on BM mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) plays a crucial role in the development of the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) aging phenotype. The BM MSC from old mice was sufficient to drive a premature aging phenotype of young HSPC when cultured together ex vivo. The impaired ability of old MSC to support HSPC function is associated with reduced expression of CXCR4 on BM MSC of old mice. Deletion of the CXCR4 gene in young MSC accelerates an aging phenotype in these cells characterized by increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), DNA damage, senescence, and reduced proliferation. Culture of HSPC from young mice with CXCR4 deficient MSC also from young mice led to a premature aging phenotype in the young HSPC, as evidenced by reduced hematopoietic regeneration and enhanced myeloid differentiation. Mechanistically, CXCR4 signaling prevents BM MSC dysfunction by suppressing oxidative stress, as treatment of old or CXCR4 deficient MSC with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), improved their niche supporting activity, and attenuated the HSPC aging phenotype. Our studies suggest that age-associated reduction in CXCR4 expression on BM MSC impairs hematopoietic niche activity with increased ROS production, driving an HSC aging phenotype. Thus, modulation of the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis in MSC may lead to novel interventions to alleviate the age-associated decline in immune/hematopoietic function.
Increased yield of gelatin coated therapeutic cells through cholesterol insertion. K. A. Davis et al. Journal of biomedical materials research. Part A 2020 jun

Abstract

Gelatin coatings are effective in increasing the retention of MSCs injected into the heart and minimizing the damage from acute myocardial infarction (AMI), but early studies suffered from low fractions of the MSCs coated with gelatin. Biotinylation of the MSC surface is a critical first step in the gelatin coating process, and in this study, we evaluated the use of biotinylated cholesterol lipid insertion" anchors as a substitute for the covalent NHS-biotin anchors to the cell surface. Streptavidin-eosin molecules where eosin is our photoinitiator can then be bound to the cell surface through biotin-streptavidin affinity. The use of cholesterol anchors increased streptavidin density on the surface of MSCs further driving polymerization and allowing for an increased fraction of MSCs coated with gelatin (83{\%}) when compared to NHS-biotin (52{\%}). Additionally the cholesterol anchors increased the uniformity of the coating on the MSC surface and supported greater numbers of coated MSCs even when the streptavidin density was slightly lower than that of an NHS-biotin anchoring strategy. Critically this improvement in gelatin coating efficiency did not impact cytokine secretion and other critical MSC functions. Proper selection of the cholesterol anchor and the biotinylation conditions supports cellular function and densities of streptavidin on the MSC surface of up to {\~{}}105 streptavidin molecules/$\mu$m2 . In all these cholesterol anchors offer an effective path towards the formation of conformal coatings on the majority of MSCs to improve the retention of MSCs in the heart following AMI."

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