RosetteSep™ Human CD4+ T Cell Enrichment Cocktail

Immunodensity negative selection cocktail

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From: 169 USD

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Immunodensity negative selection cocktail
From: 169 USD

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Overview

The RosetteSep™ Human CD4+ T Cell Enrichment Cocktail is designed to isolate CD4+ T cells from whole blood by negative selection. Unwanted cells are targeted for removal with Tetrameric Antibody Complexes recognizing non-CD4+ T cells and glycophorin A on red blood cells (RBCs). When centrifuged over a buoyant density medium such as RosetteSep™ DM-L (Catalog #15705) or Lymphoprep™ (Catalog #07801), the unwanted cells pellet along with the RBCs. The purified CD4+ T cells are present as a highly enriched population at the interface between the plasma and the buoyant density medium.
Advantages:
• Fast and easy-to-use
• Requires no special equipment or training
• Isolated cells are untouched
• Can be combined with SepMate™ for consistent, high-throughput sample processing
Components:
  • RosetteSep™ Human CD4+ T Cell Enrichment Cocktail (Catalog #15022)
    • RosetteSep™ Human CD4+ T Cell Enrichment Cocktail, 2 mL
  • RosetteSep™ Human CD4+ T Cell Enrichment Cocktail (Catalog #15062)
    • RosetteSep™ Human CD4+ T Cell Enrichment Cocktail, 5 x 2 mL
Subtype:
Cell Isolation Kits
Cell Type:
T Cells; T Cells, CD4+
Species:
Human
Sample Source:
Buffy Coat; Whole Blood
Selection Method:
Negative
Application:
Cell Isolation
Brand:
RosetteSep
Area of Interest:
Immunology

Scientific Resources

Product Documentation

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Educational Materials

(9)

Frequently Asked Questions

What is RosetteSep™?

RosetteSep™ is a rapid cell separation procedure for the isolation of purified cells directly from whole blood, without columns or magnets.

How does RosetteSep™ work?

The antibody cocktail crosslinks unwanted cells to red blood cells (RBCs), forming rosettes. The unwanted cells then pellet with the free RBCs when centrifuged over a density centrifugation medium (e.g. Ficoll-Paque™ PLUS, Lymphoprep™).

What factors affect cell recovery?

The temperature of the reagents can affect cell recovery. All reagents should be at room temperature (sample, density centrifugation medium, PBS, centrifuge) before performing the isolations. Layering can also affect recovery so be sure to carefully layer the sample to avoid mixing with the density centrifugation medium as much as possible. Be sure to collect the entire enriched culture without disturbing the RBC pellet. A small amount of density centrifugation medium can be collected without worry.

Which cell samples can RosetteSep™ be used with?

RosetteSep™ can be used with leukapheresis samples, bone marrow or buffy coat, as long as: the concentration of cells does not exceed 5 x 107 per mL (can dilute if necessary); and there are at least 100 RBCs for every nucleated cell (RBCs can be added if necessary).

Can RosetteSep™ be used with previously frozen or cultured cells?

Yes. Cells should be re-suspended at 2 - 5 x 107 cells / mL in PBS + 2% FBS. Fresh whole blood should be added at 250 µL per mL of sample, as a source of red cells.

Can RosetteSep™ be used to enrich progenitors from cord blood?

Yes. Sometimes cord blood contains immature nucleated red cells that have a lower density than mature RBCs. These immature red cells do not pellet over Ficoll™, which can lead to a higher RBC contamination than peripheral blood separations.

Does RosetteSep™ work with mouse cells?

No, but we have developed EasySep™, a magnetic-based cell isolation system which works with mouse and other non-human species.

Which anticoagulant should be used with RosetteSep™?

Peripheral blood should be collected in heparinized Vacutainers. Cord blood should be collected in ACD.

Should the anticoagulant be washed off before using RosetteSep™?

No, the antibody cocktail can be added directly to the sample.
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Product Applications

This product is designed for use in the following research area(s) as part of the highlighted workflow stage(s). Explore these workflows to learn more about the other products we offer to support each research area.

Data and Publications

Data

FACS Histogram Results Using RosetteSep™ Human CD4+ T Cell Enrichment Cocktail

Figure 1. FACS Histogram Results Using RosetteSep™ Human CD4+ T Cell Enrichment Cocktail

Starting with fresh peripheral blood, the CD4+ cell content of the enriched fraction is typically 94 ± 5%.

Publications

(51)
Clinical reviews in allergy & immunology 2017 MAY

Response to Treatment with TNFα Inhibitors in Rheumatoid Arthritis Is Associated with High Levels of GM-CSF and GM-CSF(+) T Lymphocytes.

Bystrom J et al.

Abstract

Biologic TNFα inhibitors are a mainstay treatment option for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) refractory to other treatment options. However, many patients either do not respond or relapse after initially responding to these agents. This study was carried out to identify biomarkers that can distinguish responder from non-responder patients before the initiation of treatment. The level of cytokines in plasma and those produced by ex vivo T cells, B cells and monocytes in 97 RA patients treated with biologic TNFα inhibitors was measured before treatment and after 1 and 3 months of treatment by multiplex analyses. The frequency of T cell subsets and intracellular cytokines were determined by flow cytometry. The results reveal that pre-treatment, T cells from patients who went on to respond to treatment with biologic anti-TNFα agents produced significantly more GM-CSF than non-responder patients. Furthermore, immune cells from responder patients produced higher levels of IL-1β, TNFα and IL-6. Cytokine profiling in the blood of patients confirmed the association between high levels of GM-CSF and responsiveness to biologic anti-TNFα agents. Thus, high blood levels of GM-CSF pre-treatment had a positive predictive value of 87.5% (61.6 to 98.5% at 95% CI) in treated RA patients. The study also shows that cells from most anti-TNFα responder patients in the current cohort produced higher levels of GM-CSF and TNFα pre-treatment than non-responder patients. Findings from the current study and our previous observations that non-responsiveness to anti-TNFα is associated with high IL-17 levels suggest that the disease in responder and non-responder RA patients is likely to be driven/sustained by different inflammatory pathways. The use of biomarker signatures of distinct pro-inflammatory pathways could lead to evidence-based prescription of the most appropriate biological therapies for different RA patients.
Cell reports 2017 JAN

Dynamin-2 Stabilizes the HIV-1 Fusion Pore with a Low Oligomeric State.

Jones DM et al.

Abstract

One of the key research areas surrounding HIV-1 concerns the regulation of the fusion event that occurs between the virus particle and the host cell during entry. Even if it is universally accepted that the large GTPase dynamin-2 is important during HIV-1 entry, its exact role during the first steps of HIV-1 infection is not well characterized. Here, we have utilized a multidisciplinary approach to study the DNM2 role during fusion of HIV-1 in primary resting CD4 T and TZM-bl cells. We have combined advanced light microscopy and functional cell-based assays to experimentally assess the role of dynamin-2 during these processes. Overall, our data suggest that dynamin-2, as a tetramer, might help to establish hemi-fusion and stabilizes the pore during HIV-1 fusion.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 2016 SEP

Three-dimensional localization of T-cell receptors in relation to microvilli using a combination of superresolution microscopies.

Jung Y et al.

Abstract

Leukocyte microvilli are flexible projections enriched with adhesion molecules. The role of these cellular projections in the ability of T cells to probe antigen-presenting cells has been elusive. In this study, we probe the spatial relation of microvilli and T-cell receptors (TCRs), the major molecules responsible for antigen recognition on the T-cell membrane. To this end, an effective and robust methodology for mapping membrane protein distribution in relation to the 3D surface structure of cells is introduced, based on two complementary superresolution microscopies. Strikingly, TCRs are found to be highly localized on microvilli, in both peripheral blood human T cells and differentiated effector T cells, and are barely found on the cell body. This is a decisive demonstration that different types of T cells universally localize their TCRs to microvilli, immediately pointing to these surface projections as effective sensors for antigenic moieties. This finding also suggests how previously reported membrane clusters might form, with microvilli serving as anchors for specific T-cell surface molecules.
Cell 2016 SEP

Engineering T Cells with Customized Therapeutic Response Programs Using Synthetic Notch Receptors

Roybal KT et al.

Abstract

Redirecting T cells to attack cancer using engineered chimeric receptors provides powerful new therapeutic capabilities. However, the effectiveness of therapeutic T cells is constrained by the endogenous T cell response: certain facets of natural response programs can be toxic, whereas other responses, such as the ability to overcome tumor immunosuppression, are absent. Thus, the efficacy and safety of therapeutic cells could be improved if we could custom sculpt immune cell responses. Synthetic Notch (synNotch) receptors induce transcriptional activation in response to recognition of user-specified antigens. We show that synNotch receptors can be used to sculpt custom response programs in primary T cells: they can drive a la carte cytokine secretion profiles, biased T cell differentiation, and local delivery of non-native therapeutic payloads, such as antibodies, in response to antigen. SynNotch T cells can thus be used as a general platform to recognize and remodel local microenvironments associated with diverse diseases.
Journal of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine 2016 NOV

Allogeneic platelet-rich plasma affects monocyte differentiation to dendritic cells causing an anti-inflammatory microenvironment putatively fostering the wound healing.

Papait A et al.

Abstract

Autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) is clinically used to induce repair of different tissues through the release of bioactive molecules. In some patients, the production of an efficient autologous PRP is unfeasible due to their compromised health. We developed an allogeneic PRP mismatched for AB0 and Rh antigens. To broadcast its clinical applications avoiding side effects the outcome of allogeneic PRP on immune response should be defined. Thus, we investigated whether PRP affected the differentiation of peripheral blood monocytes to dendritic cells upon stimulation with granulocyte monocyte colony stimulating factor and interleukin-4. Indeed, these cells are the main players of immune response and tissue repair. PRP inhibited the differentiation of monocytes to CD1a(+) dendritic cells and favored the expansion of phagocytic CD163(+) CD206(+) fibrocyte-like cells. These cells produced inteleukin-10 and prostaglandin-E2, but not interferon-γ, upon stimulation with lipopolysaccharides. Moreover, they promoted the expansion of regulatory CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) T cells upon allostimulation or antigen specific priming. Finally, the conditioned medium harvested from monocytes differentiated with PRP triggered a strong chemotactic effect on mesenchymal cells in both scratch and transwell migration assays. These results strongly suggest that allogeneic PRP can foster the differentiation of monocytes to a regulatory anti-inflammatory population possibly favoring wound healing.
STEMCELL TECHNOLOGIES INC.’S QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IS CERTIFIED TO ISO 13485. PRODUCTS ARE FOR RESEARCH USE ONLY AND NOT INTENDED FOR HUMAN OR ANIMAL DIAGNOSTIC OR THERAPEUTIC USES UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED.
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