Extracellular Vesicle SEC Columns

Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) column for isolation of extracellular vesicles from biological fluids

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Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) column for isolation of extracellular vesicles from biological fluids
From: 469 USD

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Overview

Extracellular Vesicle Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC) Columns are ideal for the isolation and purification of extracellular vesicles (EVs) from numerous types of biological matrices, including plasma, serum, and cell culture media, and provide an efficient method for separation of EVs from circulating proteins. Compared to other methods of EV isolation, SEC columns cause minimal alteration in vesicle characteristics such as functionality and shape. The isolated EVs are suitable for downstream analysis including flow cytometry, western blot, nucleic acid extraction, and/or functional assays.

The EV isolation protocol using the SEC columns is easy and takes approximately 15 minutes. The columns are available in three sizes for different sample volume ranges and can be used up to five times.
Advantages:
• Fast, easy-to-use protocol
• Reusable (up to five times)
Subtype:
Size Exclusion Chromatography Columns
Application:
Extracellular Vesicle Isolation

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Data and Publications

Data

Graphs showing the fractions in which particles and proteins, isolated from human plasma using the 0.5 mL Extracellular Vesicle SEC Column, were detected by nanoparticle tracking analysis and bicinchoninic acid assays, respectively.

Figure 1. Isolation of Extracellular Vesicles from Plasma Using a 0.5 mL Extracellular Vesicle SEC Column

The 0.5 mL Extracellular Vesicle SEC Column was loaded with 0.5 mL of human plasma. 100 μL fractions were collected and analyzed for particle and protein content by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) and bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assays, respectively. EVs were detected in fractions 9 - 14, while proteins were detected in fractions 15 onwards.

Graphs showing the fractions in which particles and proteins, isolated from human plasma using the 2 mL Extracellular Vesicle SEC Column, were detected by nanoparticle tracking analysis and bicinchoninic acid assays, respectively.

Figure 2. Isolation of Extracellular Vesicles from Plasma Using a 2 mL Extracellular Vesicle SEC Column

The 2 mL Extracellular Vesicle SEC Column was loaded with 2 mL of human plasma. 500 μL fractions were collected and analyzed for particle and protein content by nanoparticle tracking analysis and bicinchoninic acid assays, respectively. EVs were detected in fractions 7 - 10, while proteins were detected in fractions 11 onwards.

Graphs showing the fractions in which particles and proteins, isolated from concentrated serum-free medium conditioned by mesenchymal stromal cell culture, using the 20 mL Extracellular Vesicle SEC Column, were detected by nanoparticle tracking analysis and bicinchoninic acid assays, respectively.

Figure 3. Isolation of Extracellular Vesicles from Conditioned Medium Using a 20 mL Extracellular Vesicle SEC Column

The 20 mL Extracellular Vesicle SEC Column was loaded with 20 mL of 10-fold concentrated serum-free medium conditioned by mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) culture. 1 mL fractions were collected and analyzed for particle and protein content by nanoparticle tracking analysis and bicinchoninic acid assays, respectively. EVs were detected in fractions 15 - 30, while proteins were detected in fractions 35 onwards. Fractions 31-33, which are outside of the typical EV elution range, may still contain EVs with low protein contamination for serum-free media samples.

PRODUCTS ARE FOR RESEARCH USE ONLY AND NOT INTENDED FOR HUMAN OR ANIMAL DIAGNOSTIC OR THERAPEUTIC USES UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON QUALITY AT STEMCELL, REFER TO WWW.STEMCELL.COM/COMPLIANCE.