MesenCult™ MSC Stimulatory Supplement (Human)

Supplement for detection of CFU-F and expansion of human mesenchymal stem cells

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MesenCult™ MSC Stimulatory Supplement (Human)

Supplement for detection of CFU-F and expansion of human mesenchymal stem cells

50 mL
Catalog #05402
144 USD

Required Products

Overview

MesenCult™ Mesenchymal Stem Cell Stimulatory Supplement (Human) is a standardized, serum-containing supplement for the culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MesenCult™ Mesenchymal Stem Cell Stimulatory Supplement (Human) is optimized for the expansion of human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro as well as their enumeration using the colony-forming unit - fibroblast (CFU-F) assay when combined with MesenCult™ MSC Basal Medium (Human). Components are pre-screened to minimize lot-to-lot variability. This supplement is also a component of MesenCult™ Proliferation Kit (Human; Catalog #05411).
Subtype:
Supplements
Cell Type:
Mesenchymal Stem and Progenitor Cells
Species:
Human
Application:
Cell Culture; Expansion; Colony Assay
Brand:
MesenCult
Area of Interest:
Stem Cell Biology

Scientific Resources

Educational Materials

(6)

Product Applications

This product is designed for use in the following research area(s) as part of the highlighted workflow stage(s). Explore these workflows to learn more about the other products we offer to support each research area.

Data and Publications

Publications

(40)
JCI insight 2019 aug

Mesenchymal stromal cells lower platelet activation and assist in platelet formation in vitro.

A. Mendelson et al.

Abstract

The complex process of platelet formation originates with the hematopoietic stem cell, which differentiates through the myeloid lineage, matures, and releases proplatelets into the BM sinusoids. How formed platelets maintain a low basal activation state in the circulation remains unknown. We identify Lepr+ stromal cells lining the BM sinusoids as important contributors to sustaining low platelet activation. Ablation of murine Lepr+ cells led to a decreased number of platelets in the circulation with an increased activation state. We developed a potentially novel culture system for supporting platelet formation in vitro using a unique population of CD51+PDGFRalpha+ perivascular cells, derived from human umbilical cord tissue, which display numerous mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) properties. Megakaryocytes cocultured with MSCs had altered LAT and Rap1b gene expression, yielding platelets that are functional with low basal activation levels, a critical consideration for developing a transfusion product. Identification of a regulatory cell that maintains low baseline platelet activation during thrombopoiesis opens up new avenues for improving blood product production ex vivo.
Frontiers in immunology 2019

Defining the Signature of VISTA on Myeloid Cell Chemokine Responsiveness.

T. W. K. Broughton et al.

Abstract

The role of negative checkpoint regulators (NCRs) in human health and disease cannot be overstated. V-domain Ig-containing Suppressor of T-cell Activation (VISTA) is an Ig superfamily protein predominantly expressed within the hematopoietic compartment and has been studied for its role in the negative regulation of T cell responses. The findings presented in this study show that, unlike all other NCRs, VISTA deficiency dramatically impacts on macrophage cytokine and chemokine production, as well as the chemotactic response of VISTA-deficient macrophages. A select group of inflammatory chemokines, including CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, and CCL5, was strikingly elevated in culture supernatants from VISTA KO macrophages. VISTA deficiency also altered chemokine receptor recycling and profoundly disrupted myeloid chemotaxis. The impact of VISTA deficiency on chemotaxis in vivo was apparent with the reduced ability of both KO macrophages and MDSCs to migrate to the tumor microenvironment. This is the first demonstration of an NCR impacting on myeloid mediator production and chemotaxis, and will guide the use of anti-VISTA therapeutics to manipulate the chemotaxis of inflammatory macrophages or immunosuppressive MDSCs in inflammatory diseases and cancer.
Cell biology international 2012 JUL

New approach to isolate mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) from human umbilical cord blood.

Hussain I et al.

Abstract

HUCB (human umbilical cord blood) has been frequently used in clinical allogeneic HSC (haemopoietic stem cell) transplant. However, HUCB is poorly recognized as a rich source of MSC (mesenchymal stem cell). The aim of this study has been to establish a new method for isolating large number of MSC from HUCB to recognize it as a good source of MSC. HUCB samples were collected from women following their elective caesarean section. The new method (Clot Spot method) was carried out by explanting HUCB samples in mesencult complete medium and maintained in 37°C, in a 5% CO2 and air incubator. MSC presence was established by quantitative and qualitative immunophenotyping of cells and using FITC attached to MSC phenotypic markers (CD29, CD73, CD44 and CD105). Haematopoietic antibodies (CD34 and CD45) were used as negative control. MSC differentiation was examined in neurogenic and adipogenic media. Immunocytochemistry was carried out for the embryonic markers: SOX2 (sex determining region Y-box 2), OLIG-4 (oligodendrocyte-4) and FABP-4 (fatty acid binding protein-4). The new method was compared with the conventional Rosset Sep method. MSC cultures using the Clot Spot method showed 3-fold increase in proliferation rate compared with conventional method. Also, the cells showed high expression of MSC markers CD29, CD73, CD44 and CD105, but lacked the expression of specific HSC markers (CD34 and CD45). The isolated MSC showed some differentiation by expressing the neurogenic (SOX2 and Olig4) and adipogenic (FABP-4) markers respectively. In conclusion, HUCB is a good source of MSC using this new technique.
FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology 2011 OCT

Chondrogenesis by chemotactic homing of synovium, bone marrow, and adipose stem cells in vitro.

Mendelson A et al.

Abstract

Cell transplantation has been well explored for cartilage regeneration. We recently showed that the entire articular surface of a synovial joint can regenerate by endogenous cell homing and without cell transplantation. However, the sources of endogenous cells that regenerate articular cartilage remain elusive. Here, we studied whether cytokines not only chemotactically recruit adipose stem cells (ASCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and synovium stem cells (SSCs) but also induce chondrogenesis of the recruited cells. Recombinant human transforming growth factor-β3 (TGF-β3; 100 ng) and/or recombinant human stromal derived factor-1β (SDF-1β; 100 ng) was control released into an acellular collagen sponge cube with underlying ASCs, MSCs, or SSCs in monolayer culture. Although all cell types randomly migrated into the acellular collagen sponge cube, TGF-β3 and/or SDF-1β recruited significantly more cells than the cytokine-free control group. In 6 wk, TGF-β3 alone recruited substantial numbers of ASCs (558±65) and MSCs (302±52), whereas codelivery of TGF-β3 and SDF-1β was particularly chemotactic to SSCs (400±120). Proliferation of the recruited cells accounted for some, but far from all, of the observed cellularity. TGF-β3 and SDF-1β codelivery induced significantly higher aggrecan gene expression than the cytokine-free group for ASCs, MSCs, and SSCs. Type II collagen gene expression was also significantly higher for ASCs and SSCs by SDF-1 and TGF-β3 codelivery. Remarkably, the expression of aggrecan and type II collagen was detected among all cell types. Thus, homing of multiple stem/progenitor cell populations may potentially serve as an alternative or adjunctive approach to cell transplantation for cartilage regeneration.
Experimental cell research 2011 NOV

Focal adhesion protein abnormalities in myelodysplastic mesenchymal stromal cells.

Aanei CM et al.

Abstract

Direct cell-cell contact between haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) and their cellular microenvironment is essential to maintain 'stemness'. In cancer biology, focal adhesion (FA) proteins are involved in survival signal transduction in a wide variety of human tumours. To define the role of FA proteins in the haematopoietic microenvironment of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), CD73-positive mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were immunostained for paxillin, pFAK [Y(397)], and HSP90α/β and p130CAS, and analysed for reactivity, intensity and cellular localisation. Immunofluorescence microscopy allowed us to identify qualitative and quantitative differences, and subcellular localisation analysis revealed that in pathological MSCs, paxillin, pFAK [Y(397)], and HSP90α/β formed nuclear molecular complexes. Increased expression of paxillin, pFAK [Y(397)], and HSP90α/β and enhanced nuclear co-localisation of these proteins correlated with a consistent proliferative advantage in MSCs from patients with refractory anaemia with excess blasts (RAEB) and negatively impacted clonogenicity of HPCs. These results suggest that signalling via FA proteins could be implicated in HPC-MSC interactions. Further, because FAK is an HSP90α/β client protein, these results suggest the utility of HSP90α/β inhibition as a target for adjuvant therapy for myelodysplasia.
STEMCELL TECHNOLOGIES INC.’S QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IS CERTIFIED TO ISO 13485. PRODUCTS ARE FOR RESEARCH USE ONLY AND NOT INTENDED FOR HUMAN OR ANIMAL DIAGNOSTIC OR THERAPEUTIC USES UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED.