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BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium

Serum-free neurophysiological basal medium for improved neuronal function

BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium

Serum-free neurophysiological basal medium for improved neuronal function

500 mL
Catalog #05790
87 USD

BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium and SM1 Kit

Kit including BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium and SM1 Neuronal Supplement for culture of primary and ES/iPS cell-derived neurons

500 mL Kit
Catalog #05792
169 USD

BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium N2-A & SM1 Kit

Kit including BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium, SM1 Neuronal Supplement, and N2 Supplement-A for culture of ES/iPS cell-derived neurons

500 mL Kit
Catalog #05793
251 USD

BrainPhys™ Primary Neuron Kit

Kit including BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium, SM1 Neuronal Supplement and NeuroCult™ Neuronal Plating Medium for culture of primary-derived neurons

500 mL Kit
Catalog #05794
229 USD

BrainPhys™ hPSC Neuron Kit

Kit including BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium, SM1 Neuronal Supplement, N2 Supplement-A, BDNF and GDNF for culture of ES/iPS cell-derived neurons

500 mL Kit
Catalog #05795
641 USD

Overview

BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium is a serum-free neuronal basal medium. BrainPhys™ may be used to culture primary neurons or neurons derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). Based on the formulation published by Cedric Bardy and Fred H. Gage (C Bardy et al. PNAS, 2015), BrainPhys™ is more representative of the central nervous system extracellular environment and increases the proportion of synaptically active neurons.

Applications of BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium include culture of primary neurons, differentiation and maturation of hPSC-derived neurons, microelectrode array-based recording of neuronal activity, live fluorescent imaging (including calcium imaging and optogenetics) and transdifferentiation of somatic cells to neurons.

To ensure cell survival in long-term serum-free culture, BrainPhys™ must be combined with an appropriate supplement. For your convenience, various BrainPhys™ kits are available for primary or hPSC-derived neurons. BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium and SM1 Kit (Catalog #05792) is recommended for culture of primary neurons. BrainPhys™ Primary Neuron Kit (Catalog #05794) is recommended for plating and culture of primary neurons. BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium N2-A & SM1 Kit (Catalog #05793) and BrainPhys™ hPSC Neuron Kit (Catalog #05795) are recommended for the differentiation and maturation of hPSC-derived neurons, in combination with lineage-specific growth factors and/or small molecules (if necessary).
Advantages:
• More representative of the brain’s extracellular environment
• Improved neuronal function and a higher proportion of synaptically active neurons
• Perform functional assays without changing media and shocking cells
• Supports long-term culture of ES/iPS cell- and CNS-derived neurons
• Rigorous raw material screening and quality control ensure minimal lot-to-lot variability
Components:
  • BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium and SM1 Kit (Catalog #05792)
    • BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium, 500 mL (Catalog #05790)
    • NeuroCult™ SM1 Neuronal Supplement, 10 mL (Catalog #05711)
  • BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium N2-A & SM1 Kit (Catalog #05793)
    • BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium, 500 mL (Catalog #05790)
    • NeuroCult™ SM1 Neuronal Supplement, 10 mL (Catalog #05711)
    • N2 Supplement-A, 5 mL (Catalog #07152)
  • BrainPhys™ Primary Neuron Kit (Catalog #05794)
    • BrainPhys™ Neuronal Plating Medium, 100 mL (Catalog #05713)
    • NeuroCult™ SM1 Neuronal Supplement, 10 mL (Catalog #05711)
    • BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium, 500 mL (Catalog #05790)
  • BrainPhys™ hPSC Neuron Kit (Catalog #05795)
    • BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium, 500 mL (Catalog #05790)
    • NeuroCult™ SM1 Neuronal Supplement, 10 mL (Catalog #05711)
    • N2 Supplement-A, 5 mL (Catalog #07152)
    • Human Recombinant BDNF, 10 µg (Catalog #78005)
    • Human Recombinant GDNF, 10 µg (Catalog #78058)
Subtype:
Basal Media; Specialized Media
Cell Type:
Neural Cells, PSC-Derived; Neurons; Pluripotent Stem Cells
Species:
Human; Mouse; Rat
Application:
Cell Culture; Differentiation; Maintenance
Brand:
BrainPhys
Area of Interest:
Disease Modeling; Drug Discovery and Toxicity Testing; Neuroscience; Stem Cell Biology
Formulation:
Serum-Free; Defined

Scientific Resources

Product Applications

This product is designed for use in the following research area(s) as part of the highlighted workflow stage(s). Explore these workflows to learn more about the other products we offer to support each research area.

Data and Publications

Data

Table 1. Properties of Culture Media (C Bardy et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 2015)

Check-mark denotes physiological conditions

Check-mark denotes physiological conditions and supported activities according to C Bardy et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 2015.

Rodent Neurons Matured in BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium

Figure 1. Rodent Neurons Matured in BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium are Healthy and Morphologically Mature

(A,C) Primary rat E18 cortical neurons were plated in NeuroCult™ Neuronal Basal Medium, supplemented with NeuroCult™ SM1 Neuronal Supplement. After 5 DIV, the cultures were transitioned to BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium, supplemented with NeuroCult™ SM1, by performing half-medium changes every 3-4 days. Neurons were cultured for 14 (A) or 21 (C) DIV. (B,D) Primary rat E18 cortical neurons were plated and matured in a traditional neuronal medium (Neurobasal Medium), supplemented with NeuroCult™ SM1 Neuronal Supplement for 14 (B) or 21 (D) DIV. Neuronal morphology of BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium-matured neurons is consistent with neurons plated and matured in a traditional neuronal medium.

Primary Neuronal Cultures Matured in BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium Have Greater Numbers of Neurons

Figure 2. Primary Neuronal Cultures Matured in BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium Have Greater Numbers of Neurons

Primary rat E18 cortical neurons were plated in either NeuroCult™ Neuronal Basal Medium (NCSM1) or Neurobasal Medium (NBSM1), supplemented with NeuroCult™ SM1. After 5 DIV, half of the cultures were transitioned to BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium, supplemented with NeuroCult™ SM1, by performing half-medium changes every 3-4 days. The other half of the cultures were maintained in the same medium as used for plating. After 21 DIV, more neurons were evident in the cultures matured in BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium, regardless of whether NeuroCult™ Neuronal Basal Medium or Neurobasal Medium was used as the plating medium. (n = 2, mean ± SEM [triplicate wells were set up for each experiment]).

Rodent Neuronal Cultures Matured in BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium Show Improved Excitatory and Inhibitory Synaptic Activity

Figure 3. Rodent Neuronal Cultures Matured in BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium Show Improved Excitatory and Inhibitory Synaptic Activity

(A,C) Primary rat E18 cortical neurons were plated in NeuroCult™ Neuronal Basal Medium, supplemented with NeuroCult™ SM1 Neuronal Supplement. After 5 DIV, the cultures were transitioned to BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium, supplemented with NeuroCult™ SM1 Neuronal Supplement, by performing half-medium changes every 3 - 4 days. Neurons were cultured for 21 DIV. (B,D) Primary rat E18 cortical neurons were plated and matured in a traditional neuronal medium (Neurobasal Medium), supplemented with NeuroCult™ SM1 Neuronal Supplement for 21 DIV. (A,C) Neurons matured in BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium showed spontaneous excitatory (AMPA-mediated; A) and inhibitory (GABA-mediated; C) synaptic events. The frequency and amplitude of spontaneous synaptic events is consistently greater in neuronal cultures matured in BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium, compared to neurons plated and matured in a traditional neuronal medium (B,D). Traces are representative.

Expression of Pre-Synaptic Markers in Rodent Neurons Matured in BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium

Figure 4. Expression of Pre-Synaptic Markers in Rodent Neurons Matured in BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium

Primary rat E18 cortical neurons were plated in NeuroCult™ Neuronal Basal Medium, supplemented with NeuroCult™ SM1 Neuronal Supplement. After 5 DIV, the cultures were transitioned to BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium, supplemented with NeuroCult™ SM1 Neuronal Supplement, by performing half-medium changes every 3 - 4 days. Neurons cultured for 21 DIV are phenotypically mature, as indicated by the presence of an extensive dendritic arbor. The pre-synaptic marker synapsin (A,B; green) is concentrated in discrete puncta distributed along the somata and dendritic processes, as defined by the dendritic marker MAP2 (A,C; red). Scale bar= 50 µm.

hPSC-Derived Neurons Generated in BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium Express Markers of Neuronal Maturity After 14 and 44 Days of Differentiation

Figure 5. hPSC-Derived Neurons Generated in BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium Express Markers of Neuronal Maturity After 14 and 44 Days of Differentiation

NPCs were generated from H9 cells using STEMdiff™ Neural Induction Medium in an embryoid body-based protocol. Next, NPCs were cultured in (A,C) BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium, supplemented with 2% NeuroCult™ SM1 Supplement, 1% N2 Supplement-A, 20 ng/mL GDNF, 20 ng/mL BDNF, 1 mM db-cAMP and 200 nM ascorbic acid to initiate neuronal differentiation, or (B,D) DMEM/F12 under the same supplementation conditions. After 14 and 44 days of differentiation and maturation, neurons express the synaptic marker Synapsin 1 (green) and the mature neuronal marker MAP2 (red). In this example, neurons matured in BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium show increased Synapsin 1 staining. Scale bar= 100 µm

hPSC-Derived Neurons Generated in BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium and NeuroCult™ SM1 and N2 Supplements are Healthy and Morphologically Normal

Figure 6. hPSC-Derived Neurons Generated in BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium and NeuroCult™ SM1 and N2 Supplements are Healthy and Morphologically Normal

NPCs were generated from H9 cells using STEMdiff™ Neural Induction Medium in an embryoid body-based protocol. Next, NPCs were cultured for 44 DIV in (A) BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium, supplemented with 2% NeuroCult™ SM1 Supplement, 1% N2 Supplement-A, 20 ng/mL GDNF, 20 ng/mL BDNF, 1 mM db-cAMP and 200 nM ascorbic acid to initiate neuronal differentiation, or (B) DMEM/F12 under the same supplementation conditions. Neuronal cultures differentiated from NPCs in BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium display extensive neurite outgrowth and reduced cellular debris compared to cultures differentiated in DMEM/F12. Scale bar= 100 µm.

hPSC-Derived Neurons Matured in BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium Show Improved Excitatory and Inhibitory Synaptic Activity

Figure 7. hPSC-Derived Neurons Matured in BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium Show Improved Excitatory and Inhibitory Synaptic Activity

NPCs were generated from H9 cells using STEMdiff™ Neural Induction Medium in an embryoid body-based protocol. Next, NPCs were cultured for 44 DIV in (A,C) BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium, supplemented with 2% NeuroCult™ SM1 Supplement, 1% N2 Supplement-A, 20 ng/mL GDNF, 20 ng/mL BDNF, 1 mM db-cAMP and 200 nM ascorbic acid to initiate neuronal differentiation, or (B,D) in DMEM/F12 under the same supplementation conditions. (A,C) Neurons matured in BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium showed spontaneous excitatory (AMPA-mediated; A) and inhibitory (GABA-mediated; C) synaptic events. The frequency and amplitude of spontaneous synaptic events is consistently greater in neuronal cultures matured in BrainPhys™ Neuronal Medium, compared to neurons plated and matured in DMEM/F12 (B,D). Traces are representative.

Publications

(12)
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 2018 JAN

Temporally coordinated spiking activity of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons co-cultured with astrocytes

Kayama T et al.

Abstract

In culture conditions, human induced-pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC)-derived neurons form synaptic connections with other cells and establish neuronal networks, which are expected to be an in vitro model system for drug discovery screening and toxicity testing. While early studies demonstrated effects of co-culture of hiPSC-derived neurons with astroglial cells on survival and maturation of hiPSC-derived neurons, the population spiking patterns of such hiPSC-derived neurons have not been fully characterized. In this study, we analyzed temporal spiking patterns of hiPSC-derived neurons recorded by a multi-electrode array system. We discovered that specific sets of hiPSC-derived neurons co-cultured with astrocytes showed more frequent and highly coherent non-random synchronized spike trains and more dynamic changes in overall spike patterns over time. These temporally coordinated spiking patterns are physiological signs of organized circuits of hiPSC-derived neurons and suggest benefits of co-culture of hiPSC-derived neurons with astrocytes.
European Journal of Neuroscience 2018 JAN

Preservation of neuronal functions by exosomes derived from different human neural cell types under ischemic conditions

Deng M et al.

Abstract

Stem cell-based therapies have been reported in protecting cerebral infarction-induced neuronal dysfunction and death. However, most studies used rat/mouse neuron as model cell when treated with stem cell or exosomes. Whether these findings can be translated from rodent to humans has been in doubt. Here, we used human embryonic stem cell-derived neurons to detect the protective potential of exosomes against ischemia. Neurons were treated with in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) for 1 h. For treatment group, different exosomes were derived from neuron, embryonic stem cell, neural progenitor cell and astrocyte differentiated from H9 human embryonic stem cell and added to culture medium 30 min after OGD (100 μg/mL). Western blotting was performed 12 h after OGD, while cell counting and electrophysiological recording were performed 48 h after OGD. We found that these exosomes attenuated OGD-induced neuronal death, Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), pro-inflammatory and apoptotic signaling pathway changes, as well as basal spontaneous synaptic transmission inhibition in varying degrees. The results implicate the protective effect of exosomes on OGD-induced neuronal death and dysfunction in human embryonic stem cell-derived neurons, potentially through their modulation on mTOR, pro-inflammatory and apoptotic signaling pathways.
Human molecular genetics 2018 FEB

TorsinA dysfunction causes persistent neuronal nuclear pore defects.

Pappas SS et al.

Abstract

A critical challenge to deciphering the pathophysiology of neurodevelopmental disease is identifying which of the myriad abnormalities that emerge during CNS maturation persist to contribute to long-term brain dysfunction. Childhood-onset dystonia caused by a loss-of-function mutation in the AAA+ protein torsinA exemplifies this challenge. Neurons lacking torsinA develop transient nuclear envelope (NE) malformations during CNS maturation, but no NE defects are described in mature torsinA null neurons. We find that during postnatal CNS maturation torsinA null neurons develop mislocalized and dysfunctional nuclear pore complexes (NPC) that lack NUP358, normally added late in NPC biogenesis. SUN1, a torsinA-related molecule implicated in interphase NPC biogenesis, also exhibits localization abnormalities. Whereas SUN1 and associated nuclear membrane abnormalities resolve in juvenile mice, NPC defects persist into adulthood. These findings support a role for torsinA function in NPC biogenesis during neuronal maturation and implicate altered NPC function in dystonia pathophysiology.
Experimental Neurology 2018 FEB

BrainPhys® increases neurofilament levels in CNS cultures, and facilitates investigation of axonal damage after a mechanical stretch-injury in vitro

Jackson TC et al.

Abstract

Neurobasal®/B27 is a gold standard culture media used to study primary neurons in vitro. An alternative media (BrainPhys®/SM1) was recently developed which robustly enhances neuronal activity vs. Neurobasal® or DMEM. To the best of our knowledge BrainPhys® has not been explored in the setting of neuronal injury. Here we characterized the utility of BrainPhys® in a model of in vitro mechanical-stretch injury. METHODS/RESULTSPrimary rat cortical neurons were maintained in classic Neurobasal®, or sequentially maintained in Neurocult® followed by BrainPhys® (hereafter simply referred to as BrainPhys® maintained neurons?). The levels of axonal markers and proteins involved in neurotransmission were compared on day in vitro 10 (DIV10). BrainPhys® maintained neurons had higher levels of GluN2B, GluR1, Neurofilament light/heavy chain (NF-L & NF-H), and protein phosphatase 2 A (PP2A) vs. neurons in Neurobasal®. Mechanical stretch-injury (50ms/54% biaxial stretch) to BrainPhys® maintained neurons modestly (albeit significantly) increased 24h lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels but markedly decreased axonal NF-L levels post-injury vs. uninjured controls or neurons given a milder 38% stretch-injury. Furthermore, two 54% stretch-injuries (in tandem) exacerbated 24h LDH release, increased α-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs), and decreased Tau levels. Also, BrainPhys® maintained cultures had decreased markers of cell damage 24h after a single 54% stretch-injury vs. neurons in Neurobasal®. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that lentivirus mediated overexpression of the pro-death protein RBM5 exacerbates neuronal and/or axonal injury in primary CNS cultures. RBM5 overexpression vs. empty-vector controls increased 24h LDH release, and SBDP levels, after a single 54% stretch-injury but did not affect NF-L levels or Tau. CONCLUSIONBrainPhys® is a promising new reagent which facilities the investigation of molecular targets involved in axonal and/or neuronal injury in vitro.
Alzheimer's & dementia : the journal of the Alzheimer's Association 2017 NOV

Genetic analysis of α-synuclein 3' untranslated region and its corresponding microRNAs in relation to Parkinson's disease compared to dementia with Lewy bodies.

Tagliafierro L et al.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION The α-synuclein (SNCA) gene has been implicated in the etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). METHODS A computational analysis of SNCA 3' untranslated region to identify potential microRNA (miRNA) binding sites and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to determine their expression in isogenic induced pluripotent stem cell-derived dopaminergic and cholinergic neurons as a model of PD and DLB, respectively, were performed. In addition, we performed a deep sequencing analysis of the SNCA 3' untranslated region of autopsy-confirmed cases of PD, DLB, and normal controls, followed by genetic association analysis of the identified variants. RESULTS We identified four miRNA binding sites and observed a neuronal-type-specific expression profile for each miRNA in the different isogenic induced pluripotent stem cell-derived dopaminergic and cholinergic neurons. Furthermore, we found that the short structural variant rs777296100-polyT was moderately associated with DLB but not with PD. DISCUSSION We suggest that the regulation of SNCA expression through miRNAs is neuronal-type-specific and possibly plays a part in the phenotypic heterogeneity of synucleinopathies. Furthermore, genetic variability in the SNCA gene may contribute to synucleinopathies in a pathology-specific manner.
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